September 23, 2020, 06:02:31 AM
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Topic: Glycerol  (Read 434 times)

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Offline labman

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Glycerol
« on: June 02, 2020, 05:35:09 AM »
Hi, I'm trying to find out if there is a chemical that is miscible in glycerol but not miscible in chloroform. Thanks in advance for any help.

Offline Enthalpy

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Re: Glycerol
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2020, 05:42:28 AM »
Water. Depends on how "miscible" it should be.

Offline labman

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Re: Glycerol
« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2020, 06:07:44 AM »
Sorry, I meant to say apart from water. I am trying to find a chemical that will reduce the surface tension (i think) to allow it to form smaller droplets.

Offline Enthalpy

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Re: Glycerol
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2020, 09:01:06 AM »
When I worked with glycerol+water mixtures, making fine droplets was badly difficult too. I wanted to check the explosion risk at high pressure and achieved nothing.

Only a gut feeling: viscosity limited the production of droplets rather than surface tension. Water has a bigger surface tension and makes mist as fine as you want.

You might try (I didn't) with the pumps and injectors of marine Diesel engines. Their fuel is thicker than glycerol but they achieve injection as droplets. Experiment with a true injector first, then make perhaps your own one.

Some hand pumps for hydraulic fluids achieve 1500 bar, just couple on with a proper nozzle, possibly of a Diesel engine.

Take precautions against explosions. A burst of liquid at 1500 bar isn't very dangerous with limited volumes, but the ignition of a fuel mist can make a significant boom.

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