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Topic: Why is the vacuum in space considered cold?  (Read 19325 times)

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Offline Mitch

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Re:Why is the vacuum in space considered cold?
« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2004, 04:29:28 PM »
The molecule would still vibrate however even at absolute zero. It just something that comes from quantum mechanics.
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Corvettaholic

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Re:Why is the vacuum in space considered cold?
« Reply #16 on: April 27, 2004, 04:30:31 PM »
Ah, thats beyond me then. So if its still vibrating, that means there has to be kinetic energy and absolute zero simply isn't possible no matter what.

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Re:Why is the vacuum in space considered cold?
« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2004, 06:19:00 PM »
I think you could get KE to zero, but there are many other types of energy: Kinetic energy, electronic energy, vibrational energy, rotational energy. Kinetic energy isn't an all embracing description of all the types of energy a molecule has.
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Corvettaholic

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Re:Why is the vacuum in space considered cold?
« Reply #18 on: April 27, 2004, 06:21:10 PM »
Wouldn't vibrational and rotational also fall under kinetic? Those things are movement too, and I figured kinetic had anything to do with motion. Now electronic energy, I can't think of a way to get rid of that unless you had no mass, cause I remember in physics that 2 objects will have SOME attraction to each other because of some gravity thing related to mass. Its infintesmal, but its there.

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