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Topic: Calculate number of equivalent: organic reaction  (Read 246 times)

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Offline xshadow

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Calculate number of equivalent: organic reaction
« on: October 23, 2020, 04:29:17 PM »
Hi

I have to calculate the equivalent for this reaction:


I have 0.0102mol of sodium  saccharine and 0.015mol of iodoethane

How can i calculate the number of equivalent for this reaction?!

I know how to calculate the equivalents for :
Acid base (NaOH,H2SO4 ecc)
Redox
Salt dissolution

But here is an organic reaction ..it' s different


Thanks!

Offline Borek

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Re: Calculate number of equivalent: organic reaction
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2020, 05:29:30 PM »
But here is an organic reaction ..it' s different

It is not - reaction equations clearly show that both reactions go on 1:1 basis.

It is not clear to me what you are expected to calculate though.
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Offline xshadow

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Re: Calculate number of equivalent: organic reaction
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2020, 06:05:51 PM »
But here is an organic reaction ..it' s different

It is not - reaction equations clearly show that both reactions go on 1:1 basis.

It is not clear to me what you are expected to calculate though.


For example  some organic chemistry reaction are 1:1 but the moles and the number of equivalent  haven't the same value


For example an aldehyde that reacts with a grignard is 1:1 but it's an oxidation  reaction according to general chemistry

Oxidation number of the  C=O changes ....C goes from -1 (aldehyde) to 0 for the alcohol generated from grignard reaction
Same thing happens to the RMgBr carbon.

Now if I have 0.2 mol of aldehyde...the number of equivalent shouldn't be 0. 2 mol
For an oxidation  reaction the number of equivalent is moles/ number electrons traded

For 1 mole of  aldehyde I have two moles of electrons
So 0.2/2  = number of equivalent for RCHO in this reaction


Here I don't have an oxidation reaction,or an acid-base reaction or a salt  dissolution one

For those type of reactions I have a definition in order to calculate the number of equivalent (acid - number of H+ loss / redox -number of electrons transfered / salt: positive charge when it's dissociated).

« Last Edit: October 23, 2020, 06:15:54 PM by xshadow »

Offline Borek

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Re: Calculate number of equivalent: organic reaction
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2020, 04:07:16 AM »
Technically you are right, in practice most organic chemists I have dealt with were not that precise and used term "equivalent" in a bit lousy manner.
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Offline xshadow

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Re: Calculate number of equivalent: organic reaction
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2020, 03:54:38 PM »
Technically you are right, in practice most organic chemists I have dealt with were not that precise and used term "equivalent" in a bit lousy manner.

understood!!

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