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Topic: Help with Valence electrons and Lewis Diagrams  (Read 169 times)

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Offline IHaveTheBananas

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Help with Valence electrons and Lewis Diagrams
« on: November 13, 2020, 01:28:00 PM »
I'm taking 10th grade Chemistry, we just started looking at Valence electrons, along with electron configurations, and Lewis diagrams. I am really confused with an assignment I have. I need to make different elements ions electron configurations, but I don't know how to find the valence electrons of an ion, also, where do the dots go in a Lewis Diagram, and how do I find the valence electrons of transition metals?

Offline Corribus

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Re: Help with Valence electrons and Lewis Diagrams
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2020, 08:35:42 PM »
These are a lot of very general questions. I suggest looking in your chemistry textbook for explanations of these topics and if you have specific questions about specific problems, you post those here.
What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were like a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent?  - Richard P. Feynman

Offline masqueradesings

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Re: Help with Valence electrons and Lewis Diagrams
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2020, 10:10:01 PM »
have you found the answer yet? these are steps to draw a Lewis structure that you can refer to:
- Choose a central atom. Start your structure by choosing a central atom and writing its component symbol. This will be the atom with the lowest electronegativity. Sometimes it is difficult to tell which atom is most electronegative, but you can use the periodic table trends to help you out. Electronegativity generally increases as you move left to right on the periodic board and decreases as you move down the table, top to bottom. You can refer to an electronegativities table, but let different know table can give you slightly different value, since negative electrolyte is calculated. Once you have selected the central atoms, write it down and connect other atoms to it with a single bond. You can change these bonds to double or triple bonds as you progress. 2 player games
- Count electrons. Lewis electron dot structure displays valence electrons for each atom. You don't have to worry about the total number of electrons, only the ones in the outer shell. The octagon rule states that atoms with eight electrons in their outer shell are stable. This rule also applies up to interval 4, when it takes 18 electrons to fill in the outer orbit. Filling out the outer orbits of electrons from stage 6 requires 32 electrons. However, most of the time you are asked to draw a Lewis structure, you can stick with the eighth rules.
- Place electrons around atoms. Once you've determined how many electrons to draw around each atom, start placing them in the structure. Start by placing a pair of dots for each valence electron pair. When single pairs are placed, you can see that some atoms, especially the central atoms, do not have an absolute octet of electrons. This shows that there are double bonds or maybe three. Remember, it takes a pair of electrons to form a bond. Once electrons have been placed, put brackets around the entire structure. If there is a charge on the molecule, write it as a superscript on the top right, outside of the frame.

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