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Topic: My book's strange question  (Read 144 times)

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Offline ComradeLenin

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My book's strange question
« on: November 16, 2020, 01:10:52 PM »
While doing some hybrid orbitals exercises, i found this exercise. I'll try to give a literal and clear translation, let me know if something is not clear. The excercise: "The bond angles of 107° of ammonia can be explained assuming that the central Nitrogen atom has sp3 hybridization. If they used p pure orbitals when forming bonds, what would be the size of the H-N-H bond angles?". The problem here is that I haven't even understood what they mean, can someone help me?

Offline Corribus

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Re: My book's strange question
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2020, 01:25:57 PM »
Meaning, if the s orbitals on the three hydrogen atoms bonded only to three p-orbitals on nitrogen, what would the molecular shape be in terms of the H-N-H angles?
What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were like a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent?  - Richard P. Feynman

Offline ComradeLenin

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Re: My book's strange question
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2020, 04:34:23 AM »
Meaning, if the s orbitals on the three hydrogen atoms bonded only to three p-orbitals on nitrogen, what would the molecular shape be in terms of the H-N-H angles?

Thank you very much!

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