January 18, 2021, 03:18:54 AM
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Topic: Concentrations and solutions  (Read 161 times)

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Offline kitchen0

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Concentrations and solutions
« on: January 07, 2021, 08:16:19 PM »
Hello, I would really appreciate some help. I have honestly tried my hardest with these questions but I just cannot figure them out. I am very sorry.
The reaction of iron (III) metal with a solution of copper (II) sulfate releases iron ions into the solution through a single displacement reaction.
1. What mass of iron (in grams) is required to remove all the copper ions from a 150mL of 0.100 mol/L solution of copper (II) sulfate?
2. Determine the moles of iron ions produced in this reaction.
3. Name a soluble compound that could be added to precipitate all of the iron ions from the solution.
4. What mass of the soluble compound from part (c) is required to precipitate all of the iron ions you determined in part (b)? Give your final answer in grams.

Offline Babcock_Hall

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Re: Concentrations and solutions
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2021, 08:43:42 PM »
Please show us your attempts to solve each problem.

Offline kitchen0

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Re: Concentrations and solutions
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2021, 08:52:56 PM »
Ok so this is my attempt at 1.


What mass of iron is required to remove all the copper ions from a 150mL of 0.100 mol/L solution of copper (II) sulfate?                
c=n/V rearrange to solve for n
n = cV
n = 0.1mol/L * 0.15L
n = 0.015mol
Convert the moles to mass in grams
m = Mn
m = (55.85g/mol)*0.0.15mol
   m = 0.83775g
I am pretty sure it is right.

Offline chenbeier

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Re: Concentrations and solutions
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2021, 03:19:45 AM »
Yes correct.
But better is to develop the chemical equation first.

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