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Topic: reactivity trends of metals  (Read 12129 times)

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harrys

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reactivity trends of metals
« on: September 15, 2004, 07:33:38 PM »
Hello,

Was hoping someone could help me understand how to arrange the metals, lead, magnesium and zinc in the order of decreasing activity, and what are the reactivity trends of metals?

Would very much appreciate any help.

Thanks

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:reactivity trends of metals
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2004, 10:39:12 PM »
Since metals usually react by donating electrons, you could arrange the reactivity of metals according to their redox potential or their first ionisation energy..

I always remember the reactivity series using:
Please (P for Potassium) Stop (S for Sodium) Calling (C for Calcium) Me (M for Magnesium) A (A for Aluminium) Zebra (Z for Zinc), I (I for Iron) Love (L for Lead) Hugging (H for Hydrogen) Sussan (S for Silver) Always (A for Au, ie. Gold).
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

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Re:reactivity trends of metals
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2004, 01:14:18 AM »
Grrrrrrr.... I hate these types of questions. Activity is a broad label, what type of activity do you mean oxidation, reduction, acidity, nuclear fissibility?  :twisted1:
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