October 16, 2021, 03:16:23 PM
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Topic: Regarding functional groups of a medicine (drug)  (Read 1486 times)

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Offline MathewConnors1999

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Re: Regarding functional groups of a medicine (drug)
« Reply #15 on: February 05, 2021, 12:05:12 PM »
If you look at the side chain of the amino acid tryptophan, you will see an heterocyclic aromatic structure that shows up in many drugs.  The name of this functional group is included in the name of this compound.  With respect to naming the other functional group, the one with two nitrogens and a carbonyl group, I would think about a major constituent of urine, the same compound often found in biochemistry labs to denature proteins.
EDT
In general the effect of pH can either be on the receptor or the drug itself, because either one might gain or lose a proton.  Which functional group on this compound is capable of gaining or losing a proton?
Thank you for your answer Babcock_Hall.
It does look like a pyrrole. It that right?

The major constituent of urine is urea, right?
With regards to which functional groups that is capable of gaining or losing a proton, I am not quite sure, I am afraid.




Offline Babcock_Hall

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Re: Regarding functional groups of a medicine (drug)
« Reply #16 on: February 05, 2021, 02:05:27 PM »
When a six-membered ring is fused to a five-membered ring with a nitrogen, it is called indole.  The name of the molecule of interest is Sertindole.  Urea has a structure similar to a portion of your molecule, and it is a major component of urine.  I am not sure how to give you a hint regarding protonation, off the top of my head.  Maybe you can look at a table of pKa values to get an idea.  Some functional groups can gain or lose a proton near physiological pH, but others cannot.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2021, 02:19:08 PM by Babcock_Hall »

Offline Borek

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Re: Regarding functional groups of a medicine (drug)
« Reply #17 on: February 05, 2021, 02:06:39 PM »
The major constituent of urine is urea, right?

No, water.
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Offline rolnor

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Re: Regarding functional groups of a medicine (drug)
« Reply #18 on: February 05, 2021, 03:41:42 PM »
As far as I see sertindole is a neuroleptic?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sertindole

Is that used against Alzheimers?

Offline MathewConnors1999

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Re: Regarding functional groups of a medicine (drug)
« Reply #19 on: February 07, 2021, 06:16:27 AM »
Sorry for the late answers.

As far as I see sertindole is a neuroleptic?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sertindole

Is that used against Alzheimers?

Oh my God I am an idiot. Indeed it is not used against Alzheimers but rather schizophrenia. I am terribly sorry for this. English is not my primiary language and I didn't capture it, as Alzheimers is spelled more like schizophrenia in my language.

When a six-membered ring is fused to a five-membered ring with a nitrogen, it is called indole.  The name of the molecule of interest is Sertindole.  Urea has a structure similar to a portion of your molecule, and it is a major component of urine.  I am not sure how to give you a hint regarding protonation, off the top of my head.  Maybe you can look at a table of pKa values to get an idea.  Some functional groups can gain or lose a proton near physiological pH, but others cannot.

Serindole, indole. Of course. Thank you so much for pointing this out. I did wonder what its name was a derreviate of.

Offline ismaelyork

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Re: Regarding functional groups of a medicine (drug)
« Reply #20 on: September 16, 2021, 08:28:13 AM »
Am I wrong or Sertindole is widely used to treat chizophrenia with placebo level extrapyramidal symptoms?

Offline rolnor

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Re: Regarding functional groups of a medicine (drug)
« Reply #21 on: September 16, 2021, 09:32:01 AM »
I can see as uncommon adverse effect, "penis disorder" and "taste perversion" It does not sound good…

The drug was discontinued in the US in 2014 so its probably not so usefull.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sertindole

Offline ismaelyork

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Re: Regarding functional groups of a medicine (drug)
« Reply #22 on: September 17, 2021, 03:58:05 AM »
Yeah, that's why Sertindole isn't recommended to be used as first-line treatment for first-episode patients with schizophrenia because of the QTc prolongation. The 3 most common side effects usually are: weight gain, rhinitis, and a decreased ejaculation volume. Some studies also show that patients may have vision problems after using it. You can find more info on specialized websites about the treatment of schizophrenia though.

It seems that it's not the best drug for the treatment of anything, so it's rarely used in US clinics.

Offline rolnor

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Re: Regarding functional groups of a medicine (drug)
« Reply #23 on: September 17, 2021, 06:38:02 AM »
It should be said that all neuroleptics have very bad side-effects, weight-gain and/or extrapyramidal symptoms, also tardive dyskinesia when used long-term. And then we dont even start to mention CNS-depression and changes in brain-receptor density wich is really not a side-effect but rather the effect…

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