March 04, 2021, 01:30:47 AM
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Topic: Reaction of cyclohexylmagnesium bromide and benzyl bromide  (Read 265 times)

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Offline mglbs

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Reaction of cyclohexylmagnesium bromide and benzyl bromide
« on: February 19, 2021, 11:54:49 AM »
Can anyone help me with the following reaction?
I have no idea how to solve it.

Offline chenbeier

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Re: Reaction of cyclohexylmagnesium bromide and benzyl bromide
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2021, 12:35:58 PM »
The magnesium likes  the bromine. So what will be left if magnesiumbromide is gone?

Offline mglbs

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Re: Reaction of cyclohexylmagnesium bromide and benzyl bromide
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2021, 12:41:22 PM »
The magnesium likes  the bromine. So what will be left if magnesiumbromide is gone?

Only cyclo hexane or?

Offline chenbeier

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Re: Reaction of cyclohexylmagnesium bromide and benzyl bromide
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2021, 12:49:01 PM »
No, do you know the Wurtz reaction. Where did you left the benzyl group.

Offline mglbs

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Re: Reaction of cyclohexylmagnesium bromide and benzyl bromide
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2021, 12:59:43 PM »
No, do you know the Wurtz reaction. Where did you left the benzyl group.

I'm not sure. Is it (Cyclohexylmethyl)benzene?

Offline chenbeier

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Re: Reaction of cyclohexylmagnesium bromide and benzyl bromide
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2021, 01:06:27 PM »
Correct or Benzyl-cyclohexane

Offline BjornS

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Re: Reaction of cyclohexylmagnesium bromide and benzyl bromide
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2021, 04:20:36 AM »
Are you familiar with the term "grignard reagent"? The molecule on the left side of the arrow is one (simplified with: RMgX (R=carbonchain, X=halogene)).

The Br molecule which is attached to toluene (simplified as RX) reacts as a leaving group when RMgX attacks it.

I think chenbeier made it all clear to you yesterday. But  maybe this makes it more clear.

Also a tip: If you get a question where bromocyclohexane reacts with Mg (as the reagent) it will also form the molecule on the left side of the arrow.

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