October 20, 2021, 01:05:42 PM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: Recommendations for an organic synthesis textbook that's actually practical?  (Read 388 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Monoamine

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 26
  • Mole Snacks: +1/-0
I've been trying to learn chemistry and synthesis as a hobby for quite some time now because, let's face it, it's probably the coolest thing there is!  :D
I think the fact that chemistry allows us to reach down and transform the structure of matter itself is mind boggling!
But being an amateur who hasn't had to the opportunity to learn chemistry in a lab, most of what I know comes from books. As fascinating as these books are, there's been one thing that has always irked me about most organic chemistry (and even syntheses) books.

Namely: They usually leave out all the practical aspects of reactions and syntheses. For instance, they'll write something like: reacting methylethylketone with LAH will produce butan-2-ol. Or they'll say treating butan-2-ol with chromic acid will convert it to methylethylketone.

Ok... that's surely true, what of all the other things to take into account?: What solvent is it done in? Is it done under an innert atmosphere? How do you get rid of the byproducts that are formed afterwards? What temperature is it done at? What things can go wrong and how do you prevent it? Does the reaction need to equilibrium? Can we shift the equilibrium somehow, etc... etc...

While I wholeheartedly agree that one must understand the theory first, at some point chemistry is also a physical science!

But I have to believe that not all textbooks are like that and that some really do go into all the practical aspects of how to actually do a reaction.

If anyone knows of some textbooks where the all of this is discussed, especially for very simple reactions like like the ones you'd find in an undergrad organic chemistry textbook, I would love to hear about it!

After all, the beauty of chemistry is that it is not just some abstract thing in a book, but is actually real and alive!

Offline rolnor

  • Chemist
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1608
  • Mole Snacks: +111/-8
If you look in Marchs advanced organic chemistry you will find references to Organic Syntheses that contain syntheses descriptions like the one you want. Vogels practical organic chemistry is a practical book as well.

Offline Borek

  • Mr. pH
  • Administrator
  • Deity Member
  • *
  • Posts: 26793
  • Mole Snacks: +1737/-403
  • Gender: Male
  • I am known to be occasionally wrong.
    • Chembuddy
Vogel's practical organic chemistry comes to mind.
ChemBuddy chemical calculators - stoichiometry, pH, concentration, buffer preparation, titrations.info, pH-meter.info

Offline rolnor

  • Chemist
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1608
  • Mole Snacks: +111/-8
I did mention Vogels, Borek.

Offline Borek

  • Mr. pH
  • Administrator
  • Deity Member
  • *
  • Posts: 26793
  • Mole Snacks: +1737/-403
  • Gender: Male
  • I am known to be occasionally wrong.
    • Chembuddy
I did mention Vogels, Borek.

Ah yes, I missed that :)
ChemBuddy chemical calculators - stoichiometry, pH, concentration, buffer preparation, titrations.info, pH-meter.info

Offline Babcock_Hall

  • Chemist
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4928
  • Mole Snacks: +288/-22
Tietze and Eicher's book Reactions and Syntheses in the Organic Laboratory has some useful information.  Zubrick's book The Organic Chem Lab Survival Manual is also good on the subject of basic techniques.

Sponsored Links