June 20, 2021, 09:24:42 AM
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Topic: Old sealed glass stopper bottles?  (Read 206 times)

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Offline KatJ

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Old sealed glass stopper bottles?
« on: May 09, 2021, 11:51:07 AM »
I am Not a chemist.
I found some very old large glass apothecary bottles at an antique shop in Tucson yesterday. For some reason I bought them.
The ground glass stoppers are sealed on two of them. They don’t budge. The blue/green liquid one has some blue crystals and blue powder at the bottom. Looking around on the web I was thinking Copper Sulfide???  The clearish one has some white crystals at the bottom.  The purple tinted one is empty and the glass stopped is removable. It has a white residue toward the top of the bottle.
Anyway, I noticed that my eyes have to been itchy and sneezing/coughing more than usual.  Do you think I purchased some dangerous chemicals?
I also read about old liquid Ether in bottles that end up exploding!
Here are a few photos:
(Ok, not letting me post photos.... that sucks)

Offline Borek

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Re: Old sealed glass stopper bottles?
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2021, 04:09:32 PM »
The blue/green liquid one has some blue crystals and blue powder at the bottom. Looking around on the web I was thinking Copper Sulfide???

Sulfate. But if there is a green tint it can be something else as well.

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Anyway, I noticed that my eyes have to been itchy and sneezing/coughing more than usual.  Do you think I purchased some dangerous chemicals?

No. Doesn't mean they are absolutely safe, but as long as you treat them with some respect (no eating, drinking, gloves, glasses etc) it is quite unlikely you have something really toxic/explosive. That being said, many chemicals can be irritating, which is why they are typically kept in fume hoods. Keeping them at home is not a good idea, getting rid of them is not trivial.
 
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(Ok, not letting me post photos.... that sucks)

You probably need to resize them so that they are not too large.
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