January 16, 2022, 08:20:48 PM
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Topic: Why is it "dissolved" hydrogen instead of being considered a mixture?  (Read 812 times)

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Offline Restless_Fillmore

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I'm not a student, but these seem to be undergraduate-level questions...

Some analytical laboratory methods report "dissolved hydrogen" (for an aqueous matrix).  Why is "dissolved hydrogen" not just related to a pH measurement of the H+ ion?  I know that "dissolved hydrogen" is reporting the H2 molecules, but why would that be considered "dissolved" and not just a mixture, as it's not dissociated?


 Is it actually a mixture but is called dissolved by convention, or is it actually somehow truly "dissolved"?


Thank you.

Offline Borek

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Solution is a mixture, to some extent these terms are used interchangeably. It has nothing to do with the dissociation.

Why is "dissolved hydrogen" not just related to a pH measurement of the H+ ion?

Because H+ and H2 are two completely different things, not related to each other in a simple, non trivial way.
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Offline Orcio_87

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Is it actually a mixture but is called dissolved by convention, or is it actually somehow truly "dissolved"?
It is a solution, not a mixture or colloid, as H2 particles are small enough to fulfill solution definition.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2021, 09:45:06 AM by Orcio_Dojek »

Offline Restless_Fillmore

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Is it actually a mixture but is called dissolved by convention, or is it actually somehow truly "dissolved"?
It is a solution, not a mixture or colloid, as H2 particles are small enough to fulfill solution definition.

Thanks.  What is the source of "official" definitions for the field of chemistry?  Would it be the Oxford Dictionary of Chemistry, or something else?

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Offline Orcio_87

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What is the source of "official" definitions for the field of chemistry?  Would it be the Oxford Dictionary of Chemistry, or something else?
No, only IUPAC is truly official source of the definitions.

ISO standards are official source of the laboratory procedures.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2021, 01:08:07 PM by Orcio_Dojek »

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