October 21, 2020, 02:16:55 PM
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Topic: C02 pressure spikes  (Read 17560 times)

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Demotivator

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Re:C02 pressure spikes
« Reply #15 on: September 21, 2004, 09:02:05 AM »
Woops. I stopped far short in my iteration when I gave n = 1.7.
equation came out:
45.34 = 41.03
 
I redid it and got a new number: n = 2.26
When I plug it in van der waal, with pressure conditions of 57.82 atm (850 psi), 294.11 K (70 F), I get a much truer  equality:
54.53 = 54.54
« Last Edit: September 21, 2004, 09:16:42 AM by Demotivator »

WARRAVEN

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Re:C02 pressure spikes
« Reply #16 on: September 21, 2004, 04:55:03 PM »
AH! there we go, thankyou so much, I'll work through this, make a chart, then do the compressed air side, make another chart, and then see if I can still use the 3 point models(e-mail the webmasters). If I get it in by oct. 22nd it will be in the december issue, which comes out the first week of november(I don't know why they are a month early, but screw it), I'll be sure to mention your help ;) .

         Raven  8)

WARRAVEN

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Re:C02 pressure spikes
« Reply #17 on: September 22, 2004, 03:44:57 PM »
How did you get the n value? Did you use a quadratic equation? cause I have 4500 psi 68ci at 70 degrees I gotta calculate out too,lol. At least I know what I'm doing now, except how to get n, that will probably be useful later(I wish to go into the chemical field). Thanks again!

                Raven 8)

Demotivator

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Re:C02 pressure spikes
« Reply #18 on: September 22, 2004, 07:58:32 PM »
It's not quadratic, unfortunately. Like I mentioned, I solve it by repeated guessing. It's easy but requires repetitive calculations. It's a valid technique often used with complicated equations.

Here are the fixed numbers with n as variable:
[57.82 + (3.59n*n/.59*.59)][(.59 - n(.0427)] = n(08206)(294.11)

now, plug in a number for n on both sides of the equation:
if n = 1.70, I get 45.34 = 41.03
if n= 2.10, I get 51.68 = 50.8  still not good enough
if n = 2.26, I get 54.53 = 54.54  This is it.

I actually had to try more times than that. Fortunately, if you can write a simple computer program for the equation with n as variable, then it gets a lot easier because you just type in your n guess  and let the program do the calculation. A bit fancier would be a program that would make the repetitive n guesses for you as well.

WARRAVEN

  • Guest
Re:C02 pressure spikes
« Reply #19 on: September 22, 2004, 09:47:39 PM »
Actually, if you make both sides of the equation some type of graphable equation, you probably can just get the interesection of the two... I'll try it in a bit.

                    Raven  8)

Offline billnotgatez

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Re:C02 pressure spikes
« Reply #20 on: September 23, 2004, 12:07:25 AM »
Raven –
I have some questions.
When you use compressed air do you remove the water vapor and the carbon dioxide?
Why do you use carbon dioxide? It seems that compressed air is easier to get and has fewer problems.
Regards,
Bill


WARRAVEN

  • Guest
Re:C02 pressure spikes
« Reply #21 on: September 26, 2004, 07:46:22 PM »
Raven –
I have some questions.
When you use compressed air do you remove the water vapor and the carbon dioxide?
Why do you use carbon dioxide? It seems that compressed air is easier to get and has fewer problems.
Regards,
Bill


  Well... its the same air that scuba divers use, if thats any help. I don't think we have it, but I don't remember anything in the process that removes these(maybe theres a filter somewhere or maybe they are in such low amounts). But I do know it does not have the compression problems.
   The use of C02 was the begining gas, and I beleive it was used because the original ORIGINAL markers were cattle markers(paint you use on cattles) and they probably used that type of gas, not 100% on that though, I'll check. I do know that the C02 tanks are less costly and need to be hydro tested less. When a large(20 ounce) C02 tank costs $30-40 and a large Nitro tank(68ci 4500 is standard, like the 20 oz. kinda is) costs $290-400, most people start using the cheaper gas first. I wish I could say something other than money, but thats what it boils down to. And in some places its harder to fill compressed air, but usually it isn't... don't understand why some places have C02 filling over Nitro, even when most people use it, nitro is so much cheaper and easier, get a compressor and you can fill like crazy, gotta buy giant C02 tanks to fill C02.
   Most people switch to compressed air on the simplicity, that it works better, it works on high up markers(some markers can't use C02 because of the liquid problem, it sucks it in and freeze's the regs), but those are people who are really into the performance and tournament side of paintball. If you play it recreationally, most people don't spend that much(as paint prices are enough), but in a tournament, trust me, you NEED that advantage to do well(I have used C02 markers in tournaments, and its no fun to be firing at the guy with a beautiful shot for 4 minutes and never hit because your marker is too cold or the air is, and they turn after that long time and fire one shot and get you out, its no fun).

               Raven  :devil1:
« Last Edit: September 26, 2004, 07:48:35 PM by WARRAVEN »

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