October 23, 2021, 05:05:23 PM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: Electron Configurations?  (Read 1701 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Aesuuki

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
Electron Configurations?
« on: July 10, 2021, 05:55:23 PM »
So i understand the theory behind shells, subshells and orbitals, and how there are s,p,d,f orbitals with the energy the electrons need to access them increasing in that order.

At the moment i know: In the 1st group, hydrogen is 1s¹ and helium is 1s².

The 2nd group all have 1s² plus up to one 2s orbital and three 2p orbitals. (This means the 2nd group has 8 electron spaces because one orbital can only allow 2 electrons.)

I know the 3rd group has the same orbitals as the 2nd group plus a d orbital and that it can allow 10 electrons. That's about it though.

That is probably really hard to understand in the way I phrased it, but I tried.

I did find a method to calculate the electron configuration relatively easily (https://drive.google.com/file/d/14BlJf7WLCzHpltrmHPm_MIDFcgfDY74F/view?usp=sharing) without needing any of this, but I really don't want to hide behind a methord and not understand what's happening

Offline Corribus

  • Chemist
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3187
  • Mole Snacks: +485/-22
  • Gender: Male
  • A lover of spectroscopy and chocolate.
Re: Electron Configurations?
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2021, 11:43:29 PM »
So i understand the theory behind shells, subshells and orbitals, and how there are s,p,d,f orbitals with the energy the electrons need to access them increasing in that order.
Not totally correct as far as the energy part goes - it's more nuanced than that - but OK by the crudest approximation.

Quote
At the moment i know: In the 1st group, hydrogen is 1s¹ and helium is 1s².

The 2nd group all have 1s² plus up to one 2s orbital and three 2p orbitals. (This means the 2nd group has 8 electron spaces because one orbital can only allow 2 electrons.)

I know the 3rd group has the same orbitals as the 2nd group plus a d orbital and that it can allow 10 electrons. That's about it though.

That is probably really hard to understand in the way I phrased it, but I tried.
Not seeing a question here. Are you just looking for confirmation? This is basically OK for ground state configurations, but your language is pretty loose.
What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were like a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent?  - Richard P. Feynman

Offline Babcock_Hall

  • Chemist
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4930
  • Mole Snacks: +288/-22
Re: Electron Configurations?
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2021, 01:00:13 PM »
I might have used "second row elements" in place of "second group."  I am not sure I would have said "up to one 2s"
« Last Edit: July 12, 2021, 01:33:40 PM by Babcock_Hall »

Sponsored Links