October 17, 2021, 09:19:04 PM
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Topic: Neutralisation and Na2SO4  (Read 233 times)

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Offline Jenzer

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Neutralisation and Na2SO4
« on: September 22, 2021, 07:01:21 PM »
For the neutralisation equation:

H2SO4 + 2NaOH → Na2SO4 + 2H2O

I don't understand where the "2" in the salt product for Na has come from?

If you could point out what topic I need to study for this it'd be much appreciated.

Thank you

Offline Borek

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Re: Neutralisation and Na2SO4
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2021, 02:54:24 AM »
So basically you are asking why given compound has a formula that it has?

Why do you accept H2SO4, but Na2SO4 raises a question?
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Offline Meter

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Re: Neutralisation and Na2SO4
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2021, 08:00:04 AM »
The "Na2" comes from the 2 moles of NaOH.

Na2SO4 is somewhat soluble in aqueous solutions, so you would have an equilibrium of the solid salt and the dissolved free ions of the salt.

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