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Topic: combustion reaction  (Read 535 times)

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Offline xshadow

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combustion reaction
« on: November 02, 2021, 01:41:51 PM »
THinking at a combustion reaction like something that occurs in two steps:

1) thermal degradation of organic molecules on its elements  (C,S,H...) due to high temperature
2)  elements oxidation by O2 to form CO2, SO2,H2O

May have it sense?
Or it's wrong?

I think that those steps are much more compatible of a pyrolisis followed by an oxidation with a hot Oxygen flow
thanks




« Last Edit: November 02, 2021, 02:17:48 PM by xshadow »

Offline Orcio_87

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Re: combustion reaction
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2021, 02:51:48 PM »
Nothing degradates to the elements. Combustion goes by the free radical mechanism. The initiator is the singlet state oxygen.

Offline xshadow

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Re: combustion reaction
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2021, 03:36:39 PM »
Nothing degradates to the elements. Combustion goes by the free radical mechanism. The initiator is the singlet state oxygen.


Thanks

ONe last thing...
The Sn can react with O2 giving SnO /SnO22 .  The reaction is higly exotermic and is also an oxidation.

Can be considered a combustion reaction?

Offline Corribus

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Re: combustion reaction
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2021, 04:04:24 PM »
You do see chemical decomposition in anoxic or low oxygen environments without combustion. In the case of organic substances, this usually results in soot or carbon generation and/or carbon monoxide generation. Thermal decomposition chemistry is complex, particularly in situations when fuels/substrates are not easily vaporized prior to combustion, in which case oxygen levels may be highly variable (e.g., burning wood).
What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were like a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent?  - Richard P. Feynman

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