January 17, 2022, 07:39:37 PM
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Topic: Preventing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide  (Read 592 times)

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Offline vkdug223

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Preventing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide
« on: January 09, 2022, 12:29:41 PM »
I would like to know if mixing hydrogen peroxide with glycerin will oxidize the glycerin and decompose the hydrogen peroxide overtime, and if so how can it be prevented. Internet search results suggest that glycerin will be oxidized, but when I mixed 3% hydrogen peroxide with glycerin there seem to be no immediate reaction. Thank you.


Offline rolnor

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Re: Preventing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2022, 01:20:47 PM »
If there is a reaction its probably not so fast. If you use 30% peroxide maybe you can see bubbles. I dont think you can prevent the reaction.

Offline Orcio_87

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Re: Preventing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2022, 09:41:18 AM »
Quote
Internet search results suggest that glycerin will be oxidized, but when I mixed 3% hydrogen peroxide with glycerin there seem to be no immediate reaction.
How do you know if both glycerol and mesoxalic acid are colorless ? If I were in your place I would add some pH indicator.

Offline rolnor

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Re: Preventing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2022, 02:43:09 AM »
I think he looks for formation of bubbles. I dont think you get any carboxylic acid from this reaction.

Offline Borek

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Re: Preventing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2022, 08:45:49 AM »
I think he looks for formation of bubbles. I dont think you get any carboxylic acid from this reaction.

I suppose OP looks for anything that suggests reaction took place. Still: just by watching it is virtually impossible to spot many reactions in solutions, plus - in the case of diluted reagents - reactions are often way too slow to be detected even if they do occur and produce reasonably clear evidence. For example, even if gas is one of the products, if the reaction is slow enough there won't be bubbles visible, as the gas will have enough time to diffuse to the solution surface and get into the atmosphere from there.
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Offline rolnor

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Re: Preventing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2022, 09:45:24 AM »
I think he looks for formation of bubbles. I dont think you get any carboxylic acid from this reaction.

I suppose OP looks for anything that suggests reaction took place. Still: just by watching it is virtually impossible to spot many reactions in solutions, plus - in the case of diluted reagents - reactions are often way too slow to be detected even if they do occur and produce reasonably clear evidence. For example, even if gas is one of the products, if the reaction is slow enough there won't be bubbles visible, as the gas will have enough time to diffuse to the solution surface and get into the atmosphere from there.

I mentioned this earlier, if you use 30% peroxide maybe bubbles can be seen.

Offline jhonal

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Re: Preventing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2022, 06:08:02 AM »
H2O2 decomposes slowly on exposure to light.
2H2O2(l)⟶2H2O(l)+O2(g)
Its decomposition can be prevented by adding urea as a stabilizer.

Offline rolnor

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Re: Preventing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2022, 03:51:29 AM »
I wonder if this is correct, I found that stannates and lowering pH is used for stabillizing, Urea forms a solid complex with hydrogen peroxide, maybe this is what you are refering to?

Offline vkdug223

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Re: Preventing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2022, 09:52:23 PM »
On day 7 it is hard to tell if any reaction took place; the hydrogen peroxide seems as active as it was on day 1. I don't know what would be the result in a couple of months. I am using 3% supermarket hydrogen peroxide. I think a slightest impurity or metallic nature will degrade the hydrogen peroxide. I am also conducting experiments with other ingredients that are water soluble but are inert to hydrogen peroxide. I am not in the chemical field, my hope is that there is a technical reference available that can guide which chemicals such as salts and acids are inert. Thanks.

Offline rolnor

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Re: Preventing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide
« Reply #9 on: Yesterday at 03:00:51 AM »
Yes, the process can be very slow. Maybe you can add stannates and keep pH lower then 7 to prevent the decomposition. If you want to make this mixture commercial you need to have good stability, the bottle can "explode" otherwise. I think you need to study this, the mixture you have needs to be tested, you can not rely on published data.

Offline rolnor

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Re: Preventing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide
« Reply #10 on: Yesterday at 08:09:09 AM »
Sorry, it should be higher than 7, not lower, missprint.

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