October 02, 2022, 02:03:43 AM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: CO2 Liquid relation with Gas  (Read 424 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline joao56777

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
CO2 Liquid relation with Gas
« on: March 17, 2022, 04:50:47 AM »
Hello,
I have a doubt about quemistry that I could not do properly the maths that I want.

I work in a company and they have 100% CO2 in a huge gas tank, for welding, 15 bar, -30 degrees.
My company, pays to the company to fill the tank 250 €/TON of CO2, liquid.
But, when the welders do their job, they spent 8 l/minute (gas).

How can i get the properly the money that I spent in imagine 15 minutes of work.

Could you help me?

Offline Borek

  • Mr. pH
  • Administrator
  • Deity Member
  • *
  • Posts: 27182
  • Mole Snacks: +1765/-406
  • Gender: Male
  • I am known to be occasionally wrong.
    • Chembuddy
Re: CO2 Liquid relation with Gas
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2022, 04:56:42 AM »
Ideal gas formula is your friend - it will tell you number of moles of gas in a given volume (at given pressure/temperature). This can be easily converted to mass.
ChemBuddy chemical calculators - stoichiometry, pH, concentration, buffer preparation, titrations.info, pH-meter.info

Offline joao56777

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
Re: CO2 Liquid relation with Gas
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2022, 06:41:38 AM »
Hello,

Could you exemplify how can you achieve the results

Offline Aldebaran

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 45
  • Mole Snacks: +1/-0
Re: CO2 Liquid relation with Gas
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2022, 04:05:14 AM »
Following on from Borek’s comment and to give you a bit more help: you can find a lot about the gas equation on Wikipedia for self study but there’s a lot more than you need. For your problem rearrange the usual equation PV =nRT to make n the subject. n is moles so you can use the molar mass of the gas to get to actual mass being used. There are certain things to be careful of: firstly make sure your units are consistent and that you use a value for R which is appropriate to your units. Also note that real gases are not ideal gases so they will deviate to some extent from ideal behaviour. For your purpose this probably will not be significant but worth bearing in mind.

Sponsored Links