October 04, 2022, 07:45:22 PM
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Topic: How to simplify a chemical equation?  (Read 562 times)

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Offline anonymousstudent000000

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How to simplify a chemical equation?
« on: April 20, 2022, 06:17:33 PM »
I attached the image with the equation, I don't know why it just separates CuSO4 and put Cu²+   +  SO²-.  Why does it happen? It just ignored the oxidation number of sulfur. Can anyone help me please?

Offline sjb

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Re: How to simplify a chemical equation?
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2022, 01:59:19 AM »
(Image is Zn + CuSO4  :rarrow: Cu + ZnSO4, then Zn0 + Cu2+ + SO42-  :rarrow: Cu0 + Zn2+ SO42- in case it breaks, and for search assistance)

You can think of the sulfate ion perhaps as a "super-atom" that doesn't get changed in this reaction, or if you prefer you can split SO42- further up into S6+ + 4O2-. Note that sulfur doesn't always have a -2 oxidation state (and is very unlikely to exist by itself as a 6+ ion.


Offline Borek

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Re: How to simplify a chemical equation?
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2022, 02:50:50 AM »
I don't know why it just separates CuSO4 and put Cu²+   +  SO²-

Have you heard about dissociation of salts?
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