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Hybridization of N in CH3NO2? ?

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Joannes:
I had to write the Lewis structure for CH3NO2 and had little to no problems (only insecurity wa about the other structure with no formal charges with one oxygen bonded to the carbon), but I still don't understand what is the hybridization of N in that structure. I think it's sp2 since there's a double bond but I don't know where the lone pair is "stationed" if that's the case.

Babcock_Hall:
Can you show us what you drew?

Joannes:

--- Quote from: Babcock_Hall on May 04, 2022, 05:44:09 PM ---Can you show us what you drew?

--- End quote ---

This are the two structures I drew

Babcock_Hall:
The two structures you labeled "major" both look fine to me.  I am not sure what you mean regarding the lone pair being stationed.  Is there some reason that nitrogen would not follow the normal rules regarding hybridization?

Joannes:

--- Quote from: Babcock_Hall on May 04, 2022, 08:42:21 PM ---The two structures you labeled "major" both look fine to me.  I am not sure what you mean regarding the lone pair being stationed.  Is there some reason that nitrogen would not follow the normal rules regarding hybridization?

--- End quote ---
Sorry for the late reply. My doubt was about how it hybridates. So what i figured out was that it forms 3 sp2 orbitals, two of them with one electron, and one with a pair of electrons. Then there's a p orbital with a single electron. So it uses the p and one of the two sp2 orbitals with a single electron to form the double bond with the oxygen, the other hybrid orbital with a single electron to form a bond with the carbon, and the last hybrid orbital with two electrons is used to form a coordinate bond with the oxygen which is connected to the nitrogen with only one bond. Is that right? And if so, does the nitrogen always form a coordinate bond when it has 4 bonds and no lone pair?

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