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Offline hetero

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how to calculate
« on: July 02, 2022, 09:47:43 AM »
Please help me how to calculate...for hydrogen peroxide, I know how strong it is if I use a 3% mixture, so I make one part of 30% H2O2 and 9 parts of water and get a 3% mixture. I want to dilute the ClO2 (chlorine dioxide) that I made from NaClO2 (SODIUM CHLORITE) and otherwise I used 80% powder and distilled water 720 water+280 NaClO2 and thus got about 24% solution. I mixed this solution with 4% HCl (hydrochloric acid) - I mixed 1:1 and got a strong oxidant ClO2- chlorine dioxide...if I put this on the skin it is clear that the skin will burn. So how do you calculate how much distilled water to add to ClO2 to get a comparable solution - comparable to 3% H2O2?
Thanks for the *delete me*

Offline hetero

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Re: how to calculate
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2022, 10:02:20 AM »
thanks for the reply!! Who who wrote delete me??

Offline hetero

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Re: how to calculate
« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2022, 01:18:09 PM »
is there anyone here who knows chemistry???

Offline Borek

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Re: how to calculate
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2022, 02:53:45 PM »
It is not a problem with knowing chemistry, it is a problem with knowing what your question is.

There is no way to say what it means "comparable" solution of ClO2 and H2O2. They are different compounds, with different properties, so they react differently. You will need to define what you mean by "comparable" and then do some experimental tests to see what concentration fits your definition.
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Offline hetero

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Re: how to calculate
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2022, 04:19:04 AM »
thanks for the reply!! it's a problem, because if you use 30% peroxide on the skin, the skin will burn, if you put undiluted ClO2 on the skin, the skin will also burn....if I dilute the peroxide to 3%, it's ok - but I don't know how much ClO2 should be diluted so that the skin doesn't will it burn??

Offline Borek

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Re: how to calculate
« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2022, 07:56:25 AM »
As I wrote: this is something that has to be well defined (meaning of "burn" in the context is ambiguous, as it depends on what kind of reaction you are looking for - rash? wound? pain? - and what is the timescale) and has to be measured experimentally. Good luck finding volunteers ;)
« Last Edit: July 05, 2022, 10:40:32 AM by Borek »
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Offline hetero

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Re: how to calculate
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2022, 05:21:45 AM »
Thanks for the reply!! You're right, it's really hard to define, maybe I should ask the question how much distilled water should I dilute the ClO2 with so that there is no damage to the skin in any case. This would also be questionable, because someone could write that you dilute 1 drop with 1000 drops and it certainly wouldn't cause problems, but I don't care. If I spray an injury with 3% H2O2, wound healing is accelerated and infection does not occur. Well, I would like to achieve something like that with ClO2, since H2O2 has a potential of 2.1 and ClO2 is 0.97, which means it is better for the skin. Thank you for your time!

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