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Topic: Biomolecules  (Read 1496 times)

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Offline vernii

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Biomolecules
« on: December 18, 2022, 05:09:21 AM »
During the formation of a peptide bond, H2O is released. H+ is taken from NH2 and OH- from COOH( but it acts as acid right?, Then how?)

Offline Babcock_Hall

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Re: Biomolecules
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2022, 07:22:12 AM »
Do you mean how is a peptide bond biologically synthesized or how is it formed when a peptide chemist makes one?

Offline Borek

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Re: Biomolecules
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2022, 07:38:14 AM »
I believe OP has problems with the mechanism, that's what I gather from the earlier question about sulphonyl chloride reaction with NaOH.
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Offline Babcock_Hall

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Re: Biomolecules
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2022, 09:52:30 AM »
@OP, It is not practical to make a peptide bond from two free amino acids.*  Instead, the Carboxylic acid is made into a derivative.  Regarding the biochemical synthesis of peptide, what is done is to make what an organic chemist might call an active ester, an ester with a hydroxyl group of transfer RNA.
*I suppose that one could draw out the mechanism for acid-catalyzed or base-promoted hydrolysis of a peptide bond.  The mechanism of formation would be the reverse, but the equilibrium favors hydrolysis.

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