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Topic: How do salt (oxidants) react with solvents?  (Read 2042 times)

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Offline LUFER

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How do salt (oxidants) react with solvents?
« on: April 18, 2023, 09:46:46 PM »
Hello, I'm having trouble finding material that explains the type of salt in the oxidizing case (example Sulfur, Gadolinium, Ammonium Nitrate, Calcium Nitrate, Potassium Nitrate, Ammonium Perchlorate, Sodium Perchlorate, Possesium Perchlorate) how it chemically reacts when placing certain different types of solvents like acetone methanol and ethanol for their solubility.

Indication of book, article, links...

Offline Borek

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Re: How do salt (oxidants) react with solvents?
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2023, 03:21:15 AM »
Please elaborate, question as asked doesn't make much sense. (Which can be a reason why you can't find anything).

Gadolinium is not an "oxidizing case" (whatever it means). Sulfur barely. And the oxidizing properties of reagents don't correlate with their solubility.

Then, when it comes to oxidizing substances you listed as solvents - doesn't matter they are solvents. Methanol and ethanol are alcohols, what are alcohols oxidized to?
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Offline LUFER

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Re: How do salt (oxidants) react with solvents?
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2023, 08:11:36 AM »
Please elaborate, question as asked doesn't make much sense. (Which can be a reason why you can't find anything).

Gadolinium is not an "oxidizing case" (whatever it means). Sulfur barely. And the oxidizing properties of reagents don't correlate with their solubility.

Then, when it comes to oxidizing substances you listed as solvents - doesn't matter they are solvents. Methanol and ethanol are alcohols, what are alcohols oxidized to?

I don't know if it was a miscommunication because of the other language, but I left the names of the oxidants separate and the solvents separate.
Oxidizing agents: Sulfur, Gadolinium, Ammonium Nitrate, Calcium Nitrate, Potassium Nitrate, Ammonium Perchlorate, Sodium Perchlorate, Possesium Perchlorate
Solvent: acetone methanol and ethanol.
I would like to know the reaction and explain the behavior of each one.
Example: Potassium Nitrate using acetone solvent.

In the scientific paper called: A decade of porous silicon as a nanoexplosive material - DOI: 10.1002/prep.201300053.
It says about the types of oxidant and solvent used, but not a book for example that explains the behavior.

Offline Borek

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Re: How do salt (oxidants) react with solvents?
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2023, 11:21:31 AM »
1. We don't discuss explosives, this is part of the forum rules you agreed to when registering. We do discuss theoretical aspects on chemistry involved now and then, when the question makes sense and has wider implications than just use in explosives synthesis, and whenever the discussion is understandable to OP.

2. There is no way to speak about a "reaction" knowing just solvent and oxidizing agent. Oxidizing agent typically oxidizes something. We don't know what and it seems like you don't see why it is a problem.

3. As I told you earlier, neither gadolinium nor sulfur count as oxidizing agents, yet you list them again apparently ignoring everything any decent chemist should know about redox processes.

You leave way too many holes in the way you word and ask your question, which makes me think you have no basic understanding of the chemistry. I am locking the thread.
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