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Topic: Reagent storage advice  (Read 553 times)

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Offline elrucho

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Reagent storage advice
« on: December 13, 2023, 09:31:50 PM »
I have very recently moved to a new home. This place is much hotter than where I come from and I am now worried my reagent bottles may explode due to pressure build up. Temperature of reagents go as high as 30C. I am quite worried, since the warmest days of summer are yet to come. I can easily expect the reagents to reach 35C at some point. Everything is stored in blue capped ISO bottles (schott duran, simax) inside dark cabinets but the concrete on the ceiling warmed by the sun acts as a radiator and sooner or later the cabinet reaches thermal equilibrium with the rest of the room.

A list of some of the reagents I'm storing:
glacial acetic acid
32% HCl
acetone
H2SO4
formalin
25% ammonia
petroleum ether
methanol

I plan to store other high volatility flammable solvents, dissolved gases, and other compounds that could undergo thermal decomposition and release some gas. Does the gas released by solutions of gases slow at high pressure? Can these bottles withstand this kind of pressure? What should I do? Thank you.

Online Hunter2

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Re: Reagent storage advice
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2023, 06:05:10 AM »
What about to have a refridge for storage or air conditioner in this room. To work  under3 30 C and higher is also not nice for human being.
Generally gas containg solutions an d solvents with low boiling point are risky.

Offline liviug

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Re: Reagent storage advice
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2023, 04:03:50 PM »
I can't speak for any substance you may have in your collection, but if you haven't noticed any significant pressure release when opening such a bottle, it means you're safe. And yes. pressure doesn't increase indefinitely. There's always an equilibrium point where decomposition of a substance cannot occur unless pressure drops.
I hope you're not storing liquified gases, ok?
An example of a solution that may give you an idea how tough these containers are is carbonated water. Fill it up, slosh it around, heat it up and look for damage. I bet it will be just fine.
If storing something particularly unsafe use a deformable container such as HDPE. It will give you a good idea of pressure inside just by feeling it in your hand.

Offline elrucho

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Re: Reagent storage advice
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2023, 05:32:11 PM »
I can't speak for any substance you may have in your collection, but if you haven't noticed any significant pressure release when opening such a bottle, it means you're safe. And yes. pressure doesn't increase indefinitely. There's always an equilibrium point where decomposition of a substance cannot occur unless pressure drops.
I hope you're not storing liquified gases, ok?
An example of a solution that may give you an idea how tough these containers are is carbonated water. Fill it up, slosh it around, heat it up and look for damage. I bet it will be just fine.
If storing something particularly unsafe use a deformable container such as HDPE. It will give you a good idea of pressure inside just by feeling it in your hand.

thanks!

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