May 30, 2024, 03:04:58 PM
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Topic: Chemical Reaction  (Read 1940 times)

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Offline The futuristic

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Chemical Reaction
« on: April 23, 2024, 09:20:47 PM »
Reaction between aluminium hydroxide and sulphuric acid to produce aluminium sulphate, does need energy from sulphuric acid dilution to kick start this reaction or merely no need energy to kick start since acid and base is exothermic.
If does need kick start energy, how to calculate this energy?

Offline Borek

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Re: Chemical Reaction
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2024, 02:41:50 AM »
You mean activation energy? In theory it probably can be calculated using QM but it sounds like quite a difficult problem to me.

Such things in general are best measured.
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Offline Corribus

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Re: Chemical Reaction
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2024, 09:33:46 AM »
Reaction between aluminium hydroxide and sulphuric acid to produce aluminium sulphate, does need energy from sulphuric acid dilution to kick start this reaction or merely no need energy to kick start since acid and base is exothermic.
If does need kick start energy, how to calculate this energy?
With some rare exceptions, there is virtually always an activation energy. It may be calculated via various quantum chemical calculations - although you'll need specialized software to do it with any degree of accuracy - or you can determine it experimentally using, e.g., an Arrhenius plot.
What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were like a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent?  - Richard P. Feynman

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