July 17, 2024, 05:23:27 AM
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Topic: Why isn't Bond Enthalpy/Bond disassociation energy measured as a force?  (Read 812 times)

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Offline sd79812

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Why isn't Bond Enthalpy/Bond disassociation energy measured as a force?

I understand every bond chemically has a length and energy to break, and energy is Newton*meters, but force is Newtons.
Is the Bond enthalpy/Bond disassociation energy equivalent to the force needed to break the bond * the bond length?

Why don't we say, to break the bond from O to H we need to put magnets on left of the O and right of the H and apply some pulling force of XYZ?
« Last Edit: May 29, 2024, 05:27:40 PM by sd79812 »

Offline Borek

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Basic physics. Work/energy and force are different fundamental physical concepts. Knowing the force at _some_ point of the bond breaking process is not enough to say how much work needs to be done to achieve separation.
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