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Topic: ionization potential  (Read 5652 times)

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Offline _anant

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ionization potential
« on: December 21, 2006, 02:49:47 PM »
assuming that the inert gas configuration of atoms is their most stable  state it follows that it (in. gas. config.)must have the min. energy.(for eg unstable nucleii gain stability by releasing enormous amt.s of energy and are respectively converted to their less energy states which are stable. It follows therefore that there must be inherent tendency in each particle to release energy and get converted into its most stable state.
Now let us look towards the ionization of metals.All metals of the s block are stabilized by the release of electrons.they are converted into a stabler state and hence energy must be released in the process .WE can say that  DEL(H)<0.also there is an increase in the randomness of the system ,thus DEL(S)>0(from a bound electron we get a free one and the no. of particles increases too).thus the ionization process ought to be feasible at all temperatures and  must be accompanied with a simultaneous release of energy.
What we see in the world is just the reverse.We have to provide heat energy ,light photons etc to the metals for overcoming their ionization energy , ionizatiion potential etc.Why is this so?

Offline Borek

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Re: ionization potential
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2006, 03:02:11 PM »
Please read forum rules.
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Offline Yggdrasil

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Re: ionization potential
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2006, 12:09:22 AM »
When an electron is released from an atomj DEL(H) > 0.  The electron is stabilized by its Coulombic attraction to the nucleus and it takes energy to remove the electron.

Offline _anant

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Re: ionization potential
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2006, 02:07:49 AM »
Please read forum rules.
respected sir you have thrice initiated me to read the forum rules which i have willingly done:
i do not find any inadvertent discrepancies in my posts.Please would you point out my fallacies so that i  may amend them?

Offline _anant

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Re: ionization potential
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2006, 02:14:02 AM »
When an electron is released from an atomj DEL(H) > 0.  The electron is stabilized by its Coulombic attraction to the nucleus and it takes energy to remove the electron.
Do you mean that taking out electros will lead to excited ,higher energy species?
Also, since the electron is closer to the electron cloud than the nucleus(a nucleus can be imagined
as the tip of a pin kept in the centre of a well:(the electron cloud) and the electroststic force is
inversely proportional to the square of the disance therefore the repulsive force will outweigh the attractrive force. ???

Offline Borek

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Re: ionization potential
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2006, 03:28:21 AM »
You are required to show that you have tried. In all three cases you did nothing to prove your effort.
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Offline Yggdrasil

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Re: ionization potential
« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2006, 01:14:21 AM »
But, the electron cloud is spread out over a wide area, so the bulk of the electron cloud's charge is not necessarily closer to a given electron than the nucleus.

Plus, the fact that DEL(H) > 0 can be verified experimentally.  For example, consider the photoelectric effect.  When you shine light on a metal surface, the atoms in the metal will absorb photons which will eject electrons from the metal.  Since ejecting the electrons (i.e. ionizing the metal), requires an input of energy (a photon), DEL(H) for ionization must be positive.

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