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Topic: cyclohexanes  (Read 3833 times)

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sally

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cyclohexanes
« on: October 28, 2004, 08:59:01 PM »
We are comparing Halogens and their change in free energy on flipping from the cyclohexane conformer with the equtorial and axial substituents.  Why is it that Bromine, being a smaller ion, has more free energy when switched from the equitorial to the axial position in a cyclohexane, than Iodine?

Offline maxyoung

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Re:cyclohexanes
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2004, 02:17:51 AM »
Is it becuase bromine is more electronegative than iodine, so the electron repulsion is more than that of iodine for the 1,3 diaxial repulsion?

Offline Mitch

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Re:cyclohexanes
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2004, 11:27:57 PM »
Do you mean Bromine has a more negative (delta)G?
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