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Topic: optical isomerism  (Read 3882 times)

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sci4life

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optical isomerism
« on: November 07, 2004, 12:39:30 AM »
which one is an optical active?

n-buty bromide
sec-butyl bromide
isobutyl bormide
tert-butyl bormide

I think it's sec-butyl bromide..but i'm not so sure about it...please help


Addition of bromine to cyclopentene gives a product that could be racemic trans...is it correct?

last one:
Stereochemistry does not necessarily correlate with optical rotation rite?
« Last Edit: November 09, 2004, 08:45:04 AM by geodome »

wgmwwggmmwgm

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Re:Need help
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2004, 09:36:39 AM »
i  think you are right,belive yourself.

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:optical isomerism
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2004, 08:50:11 AM »
Quote
Addition of bromine to cyclopentene gives a product that could be racemic trans...is it correct?
this depends on the reaction condition. certain catalyst produced only one optical isomer. normally, it would be expected to produce a racemic mixture, as bromine can be added above and below the cyclopentene plane at equal probability.

Quote
Stereochemistry does not necessarily correlate with optical rotation rite?
there are many types of stereo isomerism. optical isomerism, E-Z isomerism to name a few.
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