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Topic: Hydrogen bonding  (Read 6651 times)

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Chem chica

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Hydrogen bonding
« on: November 10, 2004, 01:16:39 PM »
??? why won't chlorine create hydrogen bonds? I have read on many sites that it will and others say it won't. If it does not create hydrogen bonds my question is why.


ps: bonging is spelled bonding (geodome)
« Last Edit: November 10, 2004, 09:14:30 PM by geodome »

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:Hydrogen bonging
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2004, 04:34:08 PM »
Hydrogen bonding involves the F, O and N atoms only.

Being electronegative isn't the only reason why F, O and N are choosen. The electronegative atoms must produce a significant delta plus charge on the H atom so that it can exert suffiicient attraction on electron pairs to be called hydrogen bonding.

The Cl atom, although electronegative, is quite big. The H-Cl bond is pretty long as a result, so the magnitude of delta plus induced on the H atom isnt very strong. Hence, this hydrogen atom isn't able to strongly exert its electropositive influence.
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Re:Hydrogen bonging
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2004, 04:42:39 PM »
Strictly speaking Geodome is right. On a more broad sense any atom that is electronegative in close proximity to an electropositive Hydrogen will have a little bit of hydrogen bonding. Most textbooks argue that this is only significant with N,O,F.
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dexangeles

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Re:Hydrogen bonding
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2004, 02:12:48 AM »
can you moderators explain this a little more, i find this interesting

i thought hydrogen bonding is related to intermolecular forces such as how H2O molecules bond to form what we see as water.  Just like other intermolecular forces such as dipole-dipole, etc..

so, i basically don't understand the orginal question

my understanding is the question is askin why hydrogen doesn't bond to chlorine, which we all know is not true
i don't know i'm lost
but if that is the question, i guess we can say the hydrogen halides are present, so they do bond together

ssssss

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Re:Hydrogen bonding
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2004, 04:53:05 AM »
can you moderators explain this a little more, i find this interesting

i thought hydrogen bonding is related to intermolecular forces such as how H2O molecules bond to form what we see as water.  Just like other intermolecular forces such as dipole-dipole, etc..

so, i basically don't understand the orginal question

my understanding is the question is askin why hydrogen doesn't bond to chlorine, which we all know is not true
i don't know i'm lost
but if that is the question, i guess we can say the hydrogen halides are present, so they do bond together

Well there is nothing more difficult for a new problem solver,then just not understanding the Question.Read the questions carefully and you will find them easier.


Offline jdurg

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Re:Hydrogen bonding
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2004, 01:09:19 PM »
Hydrogen does bond to chlorine.  This is the case in HCl, a very corrosive gas that dissolves readily in water forming hydrochloric acid.  HCl doesn't exhibit hydrogen bonding, because as stated earlier, the chlorine atom is too big, and the hydrogen atom does not feel an immense pull by the chlorine's nucleus.  As a result, it doesn't have a very strong delta plus charge.  The bond is considered polar covalent, but the HCl molecule does not exhibit hydrogen bonding.  The reason why only N, O, and F are classified as hydrogen bond formers is that they have a fairly high electronegativity compared to hydrogen, and none of them have a great deal of electrons shielding their nucleus.  As a result, the electron on the hydrogen atom is able to feel the pull of the N, O, and F's nucleus which creates a slight positive charge.
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