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Topic: Nitrogen  (Read 8200 times)

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Offline P-man

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Nitrogen
« on: November 04, 2006, 04:23:28 PM »
OK, so we were doing molecule models in class and we had to do some models of a compound with Nitrogen. I made mine with two nitrogen atoms touching and my techer said that that is impossible. Is this true and if so why is it impossible? What prevents the two nitrogens from bonding? I know that metals cannot bond with each other but when was the last time nitrogen was classified as a metal?
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Offline Yggdrasil

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Re: Nitrogen
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2006, 07:53:14 PM »
Not only can you have two nitrogens, but you can have three nitrogens bounded together in organic compounds known as azides.  However, these compound are fairly unstable because there is a large driving force lose two nitrogens and for nitrogen gas.

So, the model you made could be possible although it probably wasn't the correct structure for the compound you were trying to model.

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Re: Nitrogen
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2006, 08:18:08 PM »
Nitrogen exists as N2 gas. I don't understand.
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Offline P-man

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Re: Nitrogen
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2006, 03:22:43 PM »
Well apparently they couldn't connect in that molecule. I was confused as well. I think the compound was either aluminum or sulphur nitride.
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Offline constant thinker

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Re: Nitrogen
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2006, 06:22:07 PM »
Aluminum nitride is AlN. There is only 1 N in that compound.

Sulfur nitride (has a few names) is S4N4. Look at its structure. I definately see N-N bonds.

Note: Disregard what I struck out.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2006, 12:08:13 AM by constant thinker »
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Offline Borek

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Re: Nitrogen
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2006, 07:26:58 PM »
Sulfur nitride (has a few names) is S4N4. Look at its structure. I definately see N-N bonds.

I don't  ???
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Offline mike

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Re: Nitrogen
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2006, 07:31:32 PM »
definitely(?)
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Re: Nitrogen
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2006, 09:55:14 PM »
Stop stop stop! The compound was calcium nitride (Ca3N2)and for some reason the nitrogens couldn't bond. Also, I couldn't find the structure on Google, but maybe that's because of my weak searching skills.
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Offline constant thinker

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Re: Nitrogen
« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2006, 12:07:28 AM »
O wait disregard my post earlier. There aren't any N-N bonds. I spaced it. I've been getting a lot of impairing headaches lately. I thought it was kind of funny that I was saying it had N-N bonds because I can't think of any inorganic compounds other than N2 that have N bonded to N.

In the case of Ca3N2. I wouldn't think it would have nitrogen bonded to nitrogen. I would think the nitrogens wouldn't be bonded to each either because they are both negatively charged.

[Edit] I did find a really poor representation. Type Ca3N2 into http://www.chemexper.com/.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2006, 12:12:47 AM by constant thinker »
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Offline Yggdrasil

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Re: Nitrogen
« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2006, 12:17:39 AM »
I thought it was kind of funny that I was saying it had N-N bonds because I can't think of any inorganic compounds other than N2 that have N bonded to N.

Sodium azide (NaN3)

Online AWK

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Re: Nitrogen
« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2006, 03:55:09 AM »
S4N4
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Offline Playerbeta

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Re: Nitrogen
« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2006, 11:03:15 PM »
touching?May be impossible
as Protons of an atom is positively charged, so they repel each other
In other words, they cannot touch each other
Leave some space for your model, because what they(two N atoms) do are jsut sharing pairs of electrons.
I mean, space exists between two atoms, u get what I am saying?

Offline P-man

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Re: Nitrogen
« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2006, 07:07:42 PM »
Yeah but why couldn't they share a pair of electrons in the case of calcium nitride? Or maybe they don't need to...
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Online AWK

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Re: Nitrogen
« Reply #13 on: November 13, 2006, 02:20:16 AM »
Calcium nitride is a ionic compound
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Offline constant thinker

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Re: Nitrogen
« Reply #14 on: November 13, 2006, 07:42:26 PM »
As far as calcium nitride goes...

Would you rather share a cookie or eat the whole thing?


Keep in mind what AWK said about it being ionic also.

P.S. I do know that azides have the N=N=N. It just didn't come to mind at the moment when I posted earlier, and S4N4 (the formula) doesn't strike me as hinting to an azide.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2006, 07:48:04 PM by constant thinker »
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