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Topic: Electronic transition of d-block elements!  (Read 6505 times)

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Offline Winga

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Electronic transition of d-block elements!
« on: November 19, 2004, 10:51:11 AM »
d-block elements have colors because of the absoption of certain wavelength of light (visible light) during the electronic transition.

My question is that when the e- jumps to a higher state, how long will it take to jump back to the original state? (not the exact time)

If the light emits continously to the atoms/ions of d-block elements, will the e-s keep at the excited state? So, how can it absorb energy to keep its color?

Offline jdurg

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Re:Electronic transition of d-block elements!
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2004, 01:07:13 PM »
When the electrons jump up to a higher state, they almost immediately fall back down.  At the higher state they have a higher energy which makes them not as stable, so as soon as whatever influenced the electrons to move upward has finished acting upon them, the electron jumps back down and emits its excess energy as light.  In any visible sample, there are so many electrons undergoing this "jump" that the color becomes constant.

Remember, both heat and light basically occur as a series of waves, so the influence of it is not constant.  Light occurs as the commonly described electromagnetic radiation, or a photon, and heat is a result of infrared radiation.  All of these are not 100% continuous events.  If you look at light as a particle, the particle hits the electron, excites it, and then is gone.  Once it's gone, the electron falls back down.  If you look at it as a wave, the peak of the wave hits the electron, making it jump up, then the downside of the wave hits and the electron falls back down.  This is repeated ad infinitum.  So in essence, the color you see is a result of continuous excitations and relaxations.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2004, 01:10:13 PM by jdurg »
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Offline Mitch

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Re:Electronic transition of d-block elements!
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2004, 02:16:55 PM »
Which d-block transition metal has color? I can only think of Gold but that has to do with relativity.
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Offline jdurg

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Re:Electronic transition of d-block elements!
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2004, 05:05:13 PM »
I believe he was thinking about ions.  Like permanganate, chromate, rhodium salts, iridium salts, etc. etc.
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Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:Electronic transition of d-block elements!
« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2004, 08:25:56 PM »
light is continuously around us, so transition metal ions will always remain coloured.
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Offline Winga

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Re:Electronic transition of d-block elements!
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2004, 04:21:35 AM »
If dE between two states is matched with that energy (frequency/wavelength) of light, than the electron will be excited. After excitation, when the electron does not jump back yet (keep exciting), if the light (same frequency/wavelength as before) keeps emit to the metal ions continuously, the excited electron will not keep at its excited state and jump back after some time, right?

That means the excited electron has not influenced by the light anymore (no interaction), right?

Offline Mitch

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Re:Electronic transition of d-block elements!
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2004, 01:47:32 AM »
Can you reword your question?
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