August 08, 2022, 07:02:34 AM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: The year after graduation  (Read 6752 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline fishsauce

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
The year after graduation
« on: November 29, 2006, 07:38:48 PM »
Well, this is the first time I'm posting something on this forum, but I just wanted to see what kind of thoughts were out there about this question.

I am just about to graduate with my chemistry degree. I love chemistry, but I was wondering if I should apply for a job a year or two before going to grad school, go out, see the world and get a feel for what the industry is like. I've talked to several people already with nice advice (its a good idea, its a bad idea, you'll be bored to death, just make sure you don't get a job doing titrations, etc.).

What do you guys think?

Offline Dan

  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4716
  • Mole Snacks: +469/-72
  • Gender: Male
  • Organic Chemist
    • My research
Re: The year after graduation
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2006, 07:56:40 PM »
I haven't looked into this extensively, but it seems to me that graduate study will be more interesting than going into industry without a PhD/DPhil. I'm in my final year of a masters course, and this final year is pure research (orgsynth in my case). The advice given to me by my tutor was not to even consider going into industry without a DPhil, because it will almost be a step back from my 4th year.

If you are graduating with a batchelors, perhaps you could do a research masters, I'm really enjoying mine, in fact I applied for a DPhil last week.
My research: Google Scholar and Researchgate

Offline mike

  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1246
  • Mole Snacks: +121/-35
  • Gender: Male
Re: The year after graduation
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2006, 09:56:26 PM »
If you love chemistry, as you say you do, definitely do a PhD as soon as you can. You have the rest of your life to "get a job" and it is usually over-rated anyway. You can travel and get a feel for the industry during your studies. The only downside is you will not have much money for 3-6 years, but no doubt a PhD level job should make up for this in the end.
There is no science without fancy, and no art without facts.

Offline Albert

  • Lonely Wanderer
  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1050
  • Mole Snacks: +112/-22
  • Gender: Male
  • Half Decent Pharmaceutical Chemist
Re: The year after graduation
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2006, 01:24:45 PM »
I agree. Moreover, at the end of your PhD, you might even opt for working there as a researcher or lecturer, or both.

Offline fishsauce

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
Re: The year after graduation
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2006, 04:37:55 PM »
Thanks for all the thoughts. I guess the majority of the advice I've got is like the advice you guys gave, going now would be a better idea.

I've decided to apply this year. At the very least over the last couple of months, I've taken my GREs and such. I've only began thinking of schools in the last couple of weeks.

Now is time as any to sit back and think and reflect on what I am doing and where I'm going, philosophically and literally.

Offline hmx9123

  • Retired Staff
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 897
  • Mole Snacks: +59/-18
Re: The year after graduation
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2006, 12:02:53 PM »
I would say that you shouldn't stop with a BS, but I would also ask myself how you're doing in terms of burnout. The best time to take a year off is between undergrad and grad school.  I wish that I had.  It would have made the first three years of grad school a lot easier.

Offline mir

  • Fascinated organic chemist
  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 310
  • Mole Snacks: +13/-3
  • Gender: Male
  • Visit my blog: mir.humle.be
    • My humble homepage with norwegian articles
Re: The year after graduation
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2006, 06:58:46 AM »
In Norway it is popular for the industry to give graduate school assignments related to their field on the marked. You are also guaranteed job in that industry after study. The Norwegian oil company Statoil is headhunting bachelor students for assignments related to petroleum.

If you take the assignment through the University, you might end up as a friend of mine, in Japan. He took a master therafter phd into the subject of Silica.
No single thing abides, but all things flow.
Fragment to fragment clings, and thus they grow
Until we know and name them.
Then by degrees they change and are no more
The things we know.
- Titus Lucretius Carus

http://www.ife.no

Offline Ψ×Ψ

  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 263
  • Mole Snacks: +8/-4
  • ooh, shiny!
    • carbon-based curiosities
Re: The year after graduation
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2006, 02:10:49 PM »
Wish I had the chance to go to grad school immediately after finishing with the BS!  I'll be working for a year or so between.  It's not a bad job, but it's not in my subfield/concentration so it's not that exciting either.  On the other hand, though, it will let me relax a little and allow enough time for a few things to (hopefully) find their way into journals.  Might recommend the time off if you're a little burned out or if you think some work experience would strengthen your application, maybe?
Oh, and never sign a contract before you turn at least 20.  Baaaaad idea.

Sponsored Links