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Topic: brine  (Read 6099 times)

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Offline sharkz

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brine
« on: February 01, 2007, 08:37:57 AM »
hi all, I am a Chemical Engineer studen at Aston University, Birmingham England.
in my final year project i have been assigned to design a heat exchanger
for an SBR process to cool styrene from ambient temperature
to 5 degrees celcius. i am having problem finding the cooling liquid
physical properties. i have choosen a brine solution as a cooling liquid
but cannot fine any information on the actual liquid. please could you
help me with any information in this matter? or is there a better choice of cooling liquid

thanks

Offline Dzoni

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Re: brine
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2007, 07:59:24 AM »
Why did you choose brine as the cooling liquid? Is it already found in the plant? Why not just use normal cooling water? I imagine brine would result in more fowling...

As for the info, what do you need specifically?

(BTW, for heat exchangers, I STRONGLY recommend "Process Heat Transfer" by Kern, if you don't already know about it.)

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re: brine
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2007, 05:56:19 PM »
Why did you choose brine as the cooling liquid? Is it already found in the plant? Why not just use normal cooling water? I imagine brine would result in more fowling...

in my final year project i have been assigned to design a heat exchanger for an SBR process to cool styrene from ambient temperature to 5 degrees celcius.

The cool stream in the heat exchanger has to be less than 5C in order the hot stream to cool down to 5C. Brine does not freeze at 0C for your information. Water with antifreeze is another potential coolant.
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

Offline Dzoni

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Re: brine
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2007, 03:13:32 PM »
Brine does not freeze at 0C for your information. Water with antifreeze is another potential coolant.

Good points, indeed... Not gonna argue with that! :)

Offline mbeychok

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Re: brine
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2007, 03:08:42 PM »
To obtain a brine at 0 °C (or any other coolant at that temperature}, you will need a refrigeration system in your plant.  So why not use the refrigerant itself (for example, cold propane from a propane refrigration system) rather than having to produce an intermediate coolant fluid for your styrene cooler?
Milton Beychok
(Visit me at www.air-dispersion.com)

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