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Topic: IUPAC name for following structure  (Read 6708 times)

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Offline sparklz6912

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IUPAC name for following structure
« on: March 01, 2007, 07:13:23 PM »
                          O
                          (double bond here)
H3C-CH2-CH2-CH2-C-NH2


I think that it is a pentanoic acid and I am not real sure if it would be alpha or not. If someone could please help me I would be very thankful.

Offline Dan

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Re: IUPAC name for following structure
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2007, 07:21:16 PM »
Can you explain why you think this is an acid? What is the carboxylic acid group? Is this group present in the structure you have drawn?

Start by identifying your functional group. (-CONH2)
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Offline english

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Re: IUPAC name for following structure
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2007, 09:16:44 PM »
If you're using a systematic name you don't need the designation "alpha," nor do you need it with the common name in this case.

Those designations are used to label substituents along the carbon chain, across from the carboxyl group.


The carbonyl carbon always gets the number 1 position.  You have a primary nitrogen.  What should this be called?

Offline wainblatrobert

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Re: IUPAC name for following structure
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2007, 03:41:26 PM »
Hey sparklz, as the other ones who have replied said you have to find the groups in your molecule that narrow your possible names to a specific class of compounds.
It has a saturated part...it could be an alkane.....it has a CONH2 group...bingo...an AMIDE. Then you name it as being either "the amide of pentanoic acid" or as PENTANAMIDE. The saturated bond's name root(e.g. butan, pentan, hexan) + amide at the end to show it's an amide...it's that simple. Hope it helped...message me if you have other questions!

Robert

Offline madscientist

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Re: IUPAC name for following structure
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2007, 12:54:28 AM »
Valeramide or pentanamide
The only stupid question is a question not asked.

Offline AhmedEzatAlzawalaty

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Re: IUPAC name for following structure
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2007, 08:32:08 PM »
the IUPAC name is 5-amino-pentane-5-one

Offline english

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Re: IUPAC name for following structure
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2007, 09:04:11 AM »
the IUPAC name is 5-amino-pentane-5-one

Yes but with the "e" dropped.

Offline Custos

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Re: IUPAC name for following structure
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2007, 09:57:46 PM »
the IUPAC name is 5-amino-pentane-5-one

Yes but with the "e" dropped.
No, that's not the name at all! an amino group and a carbonyl on the same terminal carbon is obviously an amide. That's like calling a carboxylic acid by the name 5-hydroxy-pentane-5-one... it's not even close. And even if it were you wouldn't call it 5- anything because you would number from the other end, giving the functional group 1.

Valeramide or pentanamide are the correct names (pentanamide  is IUPAC)

Offline english

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Re: IUPAC name for following structure
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2007, 12:28:54 AM »
Yeah as you can see I responded rather quickly.  I meant that if that was the name, which evidently it isn't, then the "e" would have needed to be dropped.


I suggest the topic starter download a freeware software program such as ChemSketch that allows for naming compounds as long as they are less than 50 atoms.


This provides ample practice, and not only so, but also applies your own creativity in coming up with your own compounds and testing yourself on their appropriate nomenclature.

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