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Topic: law of combining volumes  (Read 4259 times)

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integral0

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law of combining volumes
« on: December 08, 2004, 03:02:21 PM »
CO is oxidized to CO2 according to the equation, 2CO (g) + O2(g) --> 2CO2 (g).  If 2 L of CO(g) are mixed with 2 L of O2 (g), what is the resulting total volume of gas after the reaction has gone to completion, assuming no change in temperature or total pressure?



ANswer = 3L

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How did they come up with this answer?  I don't think I understand the "Law of combining volumes" as produced by Gay Lussac and Avogadro.  Any help is appreciated!

Demotivator

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Re:law of combining volumes
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2004, 03:14:27 PM »
The volume is directly proportional to moles assuming ideal gases.
The limiting reactant is CO. When it completely reacts, 1 vol O2 is left over. 2 vols of CO2 are produced. Total is 3 Volumes.

integral0

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Re:law of combining volumes
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2004, 03:21:19 PM »
thanks man!  I own you one.  I'm staff here too, lol, just haven't been "here" in awhile.  Nice to meet you "Demotivator"

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:law of combining volumes
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2004, 06:18:06 PM »
all these are assumed that P & T are kept constant, and the gases behave ideally.
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