October 18, 2021, 01:35:00 PM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: Bucky Balls  (Read 9013 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

confused

  • Guest
Bucky Balls
« on: December 21, 2004, 07:40:12 PM »
Could anyone please explain to me the bonding in Buckminsterfullerene? Specifically I was wondering what happens to the free valency in each carbon atom, or whether double bonds are involved. This would be a huge help to me if anyone can help, so far diagrams I have seen have been quite unhelpful in this regard.

Offline ATMyller

  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 223
  • Mole Snacks: +31/-6
Re:Bucky Balls
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2004, 05:02:19 AM »
Free valence is either in double bonds creating a delocalised electron cloud reaching over the whole molecule (sorta like aromatic sphere) or subsitueted, usually by hydrogen etc. C50H50 and C60H60
Chemists do it periodically on table.

confused

  • Guest
Re:Bucky Balls
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2004, 05:57:40 AM »
Why does a double bond create delocalised electrons?

Offline ATMyller

  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 223
  • Mole Snacks: +31/-6
Re:Bucky Balls
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2004, 04:20:26 AM »
double bond doesn't create delocalized electrons, but conjucated double bonds can create aromatic systems where excessive electrons become delocalized.
Chemists do it periodically on table.

Offline Donaldson Tan

  • Editor, New Asia Republic
  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3178
  • Mole Snacks: +261/-13
  • Gender: Male
    • New Asia Republic
Re:Bucky Balls
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2004, 06:29:30 PM »
the 2p orbitals (that contain electrons) of the carbon atoms overlap with adjacent ones to form a region of equivalent energy level such that the electrons are free to move within without promotting or demoting its energy level.
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

confused

  • Guest
Re:Bucky Balls
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2004, 07:19:06 PM »
Is this a pi oribital then?

Btw, thanks for all the replies guys :)

Offline Donaldson Tan

  • Editor, New Asia Republic
  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3178
  • Mole Snacks: +261/-13
  • Gender: Male
    • New Asia Republic
Re:Bucky Balls
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2004, 07:46:00 PM »
yes, it's a pi bond that extends over a carbon chain.
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

pizza1512

  • Guest
Re:Bucky Balls
« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2005, 08:56:42 AM »
Isn't it C60?...


 :punch:
« Last Edit: January 27, 2005, 08:57:10 AM by pizza1512 »

Offline ATMyller

  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 223
  • Mole Snacks: +31/-6
Re:Bucky Balls
« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2005, 03:07:28 AM »
Isn't it C60?...
There are diffrent sized buckyballs ranging from C28 to around C240. C60 Being the most common one.
Chemists do it periodically on table.

puru

  • Guest
Re:Bucky Balls
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2005, 11:23:41 AM »
Perhaps this might help

hroch

  • Guest
Re:Bucky Balls
« Reply #10 on: April 04, 2005, 04:09:48 PM »
That's not the complete "fullerene zoo", I'm afraid:) -  that page gives you a better idea...though it's not complete either.

http://www.jcrystal.com/steffenweber/gallery/Fullerenes/Fullerenes.html

Sponsored Links