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Topic: hydrazine reaction  (Read 19728 times)

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stylerz

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hydrazine reaction
« on: January 01, 2005, 03:00:00 AM »
can anyone give me the reaction eqn when hydrazine(N2H4) reacts with excess concentrated HCl? Will ammonium chloride be formed?
thanks
« Last Edit: January 01, 2005, 03:14:37 AM by stylerz »

NISHANT

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Re:hydrazine reaction
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2005, 12:45:42 PM »
yup. NH2-NH2 BOND WILL BREAK AND HYDRAZINE WILL CONVERT TO AMMONIA AND THEN NH4Cl.
bye

Offline kevins

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Re:hydrazine reaction
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2005, 10:25:41 AM »
NISHANT,

Are you sure the reaction? If yes, I would like to know how to make a compound of Hydrazine hydrochloride?
I think the reaction should be (N2H4)HCl and no NH4Cl.

hannibal

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Re:hydrazine reaction
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2005, 02:51:33 AM »
yup. NH2-NH2 BOND WILL BREAK AND HYDRAZINE WILL CONVERT TO AMMONIA AND THEN NH4Cl.
bye

well i dont think this is true because in production of hydrazine from hypochlorite and urea we add HCl to nutralise sodium bi carbonate.sodium bi carbonate is a side product in the reaction.

Offline woelen

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Re:hydrazine reaction
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2005, 04:32:14 AM »
The reaction between hydrazine and HCl is very simple and completeluy analogous to the reaction between ammonia and HCl. In a solution of HCl you have H(+) and Cl(-) ions. The Cl(-) ions do nothing and are spectator ions.

With ammonia you have:
NH3(aq) + H+ ---> NH4+(aq)

On evaporation you get ammonium chloride NH4Cl.

Completely analogous is the reaction with hydrazine:


N2H4(aq) + H+ ---> N2H5+(aq)

On evaporation you get hydrazinium chloride N2H5Cl (this also is called hydrazine monohydrochloride and written as N2H4.HCl, but the latter notation is not really good).


In excess acid, the reaction even goes further on the other NH2-group of hydrazine:

N2H5+(aq) + H+ ---> N2H62+(aq)

On evaporation you get N2H6Cl2 (this is called hydrazine dihydrochloride and written as N2H4.2HCl, but the latter notation is not really good).

The latter salt is commercially available (in fact, I have some in my home lab and it is a white crystalline solid, which is quite acidic, when dissolved in water).
« Last Edit: June 14, 2005, 04:35:24 AM by woelen »
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Offline xiankai

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Re:hydrazine reaction
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2005, 08:21:04 AM »
The reaction between hydrazine and HCl is very simple and completeluy analogous to the reaction between ammonia and HCl. In a solution of HCl you have H(+) and Cl(-) ions. The Cl(-) ions do nothing and are spectator ions.

With ammonia you have:
NH3(aq) + H+ ---> NH4+(aq)

On evaporation you get ammonium chloride NH4Cl.

Completely analogous is the reaction with hydrazine:


N2H4(aq) + H+ ---> N2H5+(aq)

On evaporation you get hydrazinium chloride N2H5Cl (this also is called hydrazine monohydrochloride and written as N2H4.HCl, but the latter notation is not really good).


In excess acid, the reaction even goes further on the other NH2-group of hydrazine:

N2H5+(aq) + H+ ---> N2H62+(aq)

On evaporation you get N2H6Cl2 (this is called hydrazine dihydrochloride and written as N2H4.2HCl, but the latter notation is not really good).

The latter salt is commercially available (in fact, I have some in my home lab and it is a white crystalline solid, which is quite acidic, when dissolved in water).

the reactions are familar to that of addition reactions of hydrocarbons with functional groups, could that be due to the amine(NH2-NH2) bonds?
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