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Topic: carbon dioxide absorption by solids and aqueous solutions  (Read 2838 times)

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Offline Vicstar

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carbon dioxide absorption by solids and aqueous solutions
« on: July 28, 2007, 08:06:08 AM »
What dictates carbon dioxide gas absorption throughout solids and aqueous solutions?

Given the following substances, KOH(s), SiO2(s) ,HCl(aq) and (NaF), which one absorbs CO2(g0 most effectively?

I would have thought it would be the HCl(aq) becuase the CO2(g) aborption would be promoted by all the free H3O+(aq) ions to form hydrogen carbonate and then bicarbonate. But this is not the case.

The answer is KOH(s) but why? and by what means does it make it more efficient than the HCl(aq). I mean, its a solid after all. Has it got something to do with the -OH bonds? What am I missing?

Offline Sam (NG)

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Re: carbon dioxide absorption by solids and aqueous solutions
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2007, 08:17:10 AM »
This may help: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soda_lime (steps 1 & 2, substituting KOH for NaOH).

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