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Topic: What is the lewis dot diagram for C(sub)6H(sub)6?  (Read 5854 times)

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LainOfTheWired

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What is the lewis dot diagram for C(sub)6H(sub)6?
« on: February 01, 2005, 10:27:11 PM »
I have a couple attempts at what the drawing for C6H6 would look like bonded in lewis dot structure, but i'm not exactly sure.  Any ideas?  Thanks.

Kong

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Re:What is the lewis dot diagram for C(sub)6H(sub)6?
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2005, 10:32:57 PM »
Its called benzene. Aromatic ring with alternating double bonds.  Very common organic functional group.  If you search you will learn.  
as

LainOfTheWired

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Re:What is the lewis dot diagram for C(sub)6H(sub)6?
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2005, 10:38:39 PM »
Thank you very much.   ;D

Offline Mitch

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Re:What is the lewis dot diagram for C(sub)6H(sub)6?
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2005, 11:31:12 PM »
It should be in the list of "common names" to the left.
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dexangeles

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Re:What is the lewis dot diagram for C(sub)6H(sub)6?
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2005, 02:03:36 AM »
you can have other possibilities besides benzene :)

Offline Mitch

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Re:What is the lewis dot diagram for C(sub)6H(sub)6?
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2005, 04:48:33 AM »
True, but benzene would probably be the most thermodynamic stable isomer. Look everyone I can actually use the word "stable". This time... ;)
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