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Topic: Salt  (Read 7142 times)

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Offline Kate

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Salt
« on: November 26, 2007, 11:47:15 AM »
Hi.  :)
Probably a stupid question, but is Pb(OH)2 a salt ? And what about H[PbCl3] and PbI2 ? Thanks.

(I think they all are, but I just need someone's confirmation on this).

Offline AWK

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Re: Salt
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2007, 12:06:51 PM »
what does mean OH group?
What does mean H at beginning of formula?

correction of printing error
« Last Edit: November 27, 2007, 01:07:53 AM by AWK »
AWK

Offline Kate

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Re: Salt
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2007, 12:48:10 PM »
OH- is the ion hydroxide. The H at the beginning of the formula is the ion H+. Right ?

Offline Borek

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Re: Salt
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2007, 12:57:16 PM »
OK, what compounds contain these ions?
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Offline Kate

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Re: Salt
« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2007, 10:27:24 AM »
Acids contain H+ ions while bases contain OH- ions. I also know that a reaction between an acid and a base leads to the formation of a salt and water.

Offline Borek

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Re: Salt
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2007, 10:51:38 AM »
is Pb(OH)2 a salt ? And what about H[PbCl3]?

Acids contain H+ ions while bases contain OH- ions.

You know everything you need, just apply this knowledge to the question :)
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Offline Kate

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Re: Salt
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2007, 11:58:12 AM »
So basically, Pb(OH)2 and H[PbCl3] aren't salts, while PbI2 is a salt, right ?

Before I created this thread I saw that on wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt_%28chemistry%29, it says the following:

Common salt-forming anions (and the name of the parent acids in parentheses) include:

...
hydroxide OH− (water)
...

Hence I thought that Pb(OH)2 was a salt.

Offline AWK

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Re: Salt
« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2007, 12:55:43 PM »
But wikipedia entry, unfortunately, talking on salt hydrolysis, not about salt constituents.
 
Quote
There are several varieties of salts. Salts that produce hydroxide ions when dissolved in water are basic salts and salts that produce hydronium ions in water acid salts. Neutral salts are those that are neither acid nor basic salts.

Of course, there are also salts and hydroxides simultaneously, ie Ca(OH)Cl
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Offline Kate

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Re: Salt
« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2007, 06:53:26 PM »
Thanks.

Offline P

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Re: Salt
« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2007, 06:22:49 AM »
 so basically the resulting product of your componants will be the salt - PbCl2. (?)

Pb(OH)2 (alkali) +  2H[PbCl3] (acid) => 2H20 + 3PbCl2 (salt)
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Offline Kate

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Re: Salt
« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2007, 05:42:41 PM »
so basically the resulting product of your componants will be the salt - PbCl2. (?)

Pb(OH)2 (alkali) +  2H[PbCl3] (acid) => 2H20 + 3PbCl2 (salt)

Yes, I understand that PbCl2 is a salt. Thanks.

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