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Topic: Lewis acid/base  (Read 4992 times)

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Offline 21385

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Lewis acid/base
« on: December 28, 2007, 12:28:23 AM »
Is IF(3) a lewis acid or base?

The Lewis diagram shows that it has a T-shaped configuration but I don't know how do you classify lewis acid/base for atoms exceeding the octet rule. Thanks

Offline LQ43

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Re: Lewis acid/base
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2007, 12:40:01 AM »
What is the defn of a Lewis acid / Lewis base?

Would IF3 with its extra electron pairs want to accept or donate electrons?


Offline 21385

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Re: Lewis acid/base
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2007, 01:18:43 AM »
I don't know, the solution to this answer says that it is a lewis acid but I am not sure if it is a typo or not.  Although it has extra electrons pairs that would make a lewis base, I am not sure whether iodine could use its d-orbitals to take in more pairs, which would it make it a lewis acid.


Offline AWK

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Re: Lewis acid/base
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2007, 04:56:20 AM »
There is no simple answer to this question except geometry.
IF3 is a Lewis base (formally it has free electron pairs), but is is also electron deficient (Lewis acid). As far as I know only relatively stable IF4- salts are known (this means IF3 reacts as Lewis acid).
There is rather little chance to check IF3 basicity since this compound is unstable. You should search a literature or monographs for eventual formation BF3.IF3 but I think its structure will be  IF2+BF4-.
AWK

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