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Topic: What's meant by the steady state approximation in chemical kinetics?  (Read 5929 times)

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Offline Winga

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1. What's meant by the steady state approximation in chemical kinetics?
2. Why is it useful and under what conditions is it valid?

Offline Mitch

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Re:What's meant by the steady state approximation in chemical kinetics?
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2005, 12:00:14 AM »
I'm sure there is a huge section in your book about this. Be more specific.
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Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:What's meant by the steady state approximation in chemical kinetics?
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2005, 07:15:36 AM »
i am examining this question for a chemical engineer's point of view:

steady state means there is no accumulation of intermediate species throughout the process. it's a valid assumption because:
1. there are no intermediates at the end of the reaction.
2. the extent of reaction between the product and intermediate is either zero or insignificant
3. the elementary step to form the final product is irreversible

it's a useful approximation because it simplifies the derivation of the rate law.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2005, 07:17:06 AM by geodome »
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