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Topic: Equation Writing  (Read 3375 times)

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libra78wolf

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Equation Writing
« on: February 24, 2005, 08:20:34 PM »
I did a  workshop and am having a few problems understanding three of the questions.

When Benzene, is burned in excess of oxygen

my teacher gave us the answers
2C6H6 + 150--> 6H2O+CO2

A piece of rubidium is dropped in water., a violent reaction occurs
2RB+H2O-->2RbOH + H2
why can't you just write RbH2O: referring to reactant side?

A solution of ammonia is mixed with a solution of sulfric acid

2NH3+H2SO4-->(NH4)2SO4

Why does it change to ammonium on the reactant side with a subscript of 2?

Dante

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Re:Equation Writing
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2005, 11:11:59 PM »
Maybe i can help in this situation (Rubidium one)

I know one thing about water, they can't be other element be one with them (RbH2O) so it is not a weird thing when Rubidium Hydroxide occurs. Hope Helps

Offline AWK

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Re:Equation Writing
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2005, 01:55:13 AM »
Quote
2C6H6 + 150--> 6H2O+CO2

Should be
2C6H6 + 1502 --> 6H2O+12CO2

Quote
why can't you just write RbH2O: referring to reactant side?

A gaseous H2 is evolved, hence we should write down two compounds

Quote
Why does it change to ammonium on the reactant side with a subscript of 2

Chemists use a specific kind of "chemical algebra" to write down empirical formulas and reactions.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2005, 01:56:21 AM by AWK »
AWK

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