June 06, 2020, 11:02:28 AM
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Topic: No idea where to put this, but I figure the content will probably apply to all  (Read 19401 times)

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Offline agrobert

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Yes.  Hydrocarbons can be any length with any branching as long as formulae follow CnH2n+2.  Different lengths are found in natural as well, but they are often functionalized by unsaturation, rings and/or oxygen/nitrogen containing moeties.
In the realm of scientific observation, luck is only granted to those who are prepared. -Louis Pasteur

Offline Mitch

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Seriously, go buy yourself this book: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0486656225/thechemicalfo-20?creative=327641&camp=14573&link_code=as1

It covers everything you've asked here already. You can find it at most book stores, or have them order it for you through your parents or something. It is less than $15.
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Offline Borek

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I realize this as well. Also, the older books may be better for info about compounds, but the farther back you go, the less elements there were. I have a pamphlet that I got in 1999, with an ancient periodic table in it. Rutherfordium hadn't been named yet, and Tungsten was still called Wolfram. The only accurate part was the atomic weight.

These are minor details. You may safely assume General Chemistry books from the last 30 years to be up to date. Perhaps even form the last 50 years. Sure, some of them can be bad, weak, or unreadable, but the basics have not changed.

And while these older books may not contain some of the new elements it doesn't matter - element that has been observed three times, all eight atoms of it, is - to say the least - esoteric. Sure, it is an interesting area of research, but it doesn't change Chem101. You see - it is like Route 66 sticker on the Plymouth Cuda. Remove the sticker and you still have a muscle car :)


Oh, and go check this link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_alkanes

You sure have a lot to learn, including how to efficiently use Google :P
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Offline Professor Gaarder

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Sorry it took me so long to reply.

Holy crap that's a lot of alkanes.

Anyway, my website is just about up, I just have to wait until monday because freewebs sites under 7 days old can't have files over 750 kb. On tuesday, if you get a chance, you can check

http://mgchemdb.webs.com/

Web layout and information by me.

Offline Professor Gaarder

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Offline Professor Gaarder

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also I'm going to http://www.thenakedscientists.com/ forum as well with this idea, and they are being just as productive and helpful with this idea. I must thank all of you for your advice, as well as your convincing words. You are all right. I am not (or was not) very knowledgeable in chemistry when I came here, but after a three-week break from this forum, I now completely understand covalent bonds, as well as what gives hydrogen it's pop.

Offline Borek

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after a three-week break from this forum, I now completely understand covalent bonds

Fantastic. A friend of mine have spent last 30 years researching covalent bonds and he still dosn't know everything. And you have understood everything in three weeks. You must be a real genius.
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Offline Professor Gaarder

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I don't understand ALL of the covalent bonds theory, but I find single bonds pretty simple:

Atom 1: I'll give you one of my electrons if you give me one of yours!
Atom 2: Okay!

hence, they bond. just not in so few words.

each atom puts up an equal amount of electrons between 1 and 3. the point for each atom is to fill the outermost orbital. I find that fairly simple. everyone complains about covalent bond (OH NO, LEARNING!!) but you can summarize it easily.

Offline Nikola

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I think that you still need to mature a little and develop your skills in comprehensive reading, and critical thinking. It seems that you are more in love with the idea of being a chemist then actually doing the work that it takes to get there. For example

"This is what has been plaguing me ever since my google searches turned up nothing past C12H26."

If you had read a book you would have known that you should have been able to figure this out on your own. Its as clear as day in the books I own.


Offline Professor Gaarder

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yeah, kind of

it's not that I don't want to do the work, it's just that my skill in searching is lacking

I'm on a tight budget, so all I can get for books on chemistry are rejects from a school supply donation center. plus what the library has, and the closest library to me doesn't have very many options.


but I'm still saving for a chemistry set! :D


I don't know if I've already said this, but I'm also recording lectures about what I do know and posting them on my website. They're not up yet because my internet is slow, but I'm going to my friend's house tomorrow and they have lightning fast internet.

Offline Arkcon

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but I'm still saving for a chemistry set! :D


Modern chemistry sets are so lame, they have none of the excitingly hazardous chemicals I used to play with, all those years ago.  Some of the kitchen chemistry books you can find will teach you some useful concepts though, safely and cheaply.  So look into those.
Hey, I'm not judging.  I just like to shoot straight.  I'm a man of science.

Offline agrobert

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^^What is your website?
In the realm of scientific observation, luck is only granted to those who are prepared. -Louis Pasteur

Offline Borek

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Looks like http://mgchemdb.webs.com is the place.

No comment.
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Offline Professor Gaarder

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Modern chemistry sets are so lame, they have none of the excitingly hazardous chemicals I used to play with, all those years ago.  Some of the kitchen chemistry books you can find will teach you some useful concepts though, safely and cheaply.  So look into those.

The chemistry kit I have my eye on just has beakers, test tubes, goggles and a booklet on how to safely use the set. From there, it's all up to a) what chemicals you can afford, and b) your immagination.

mainly the latter of the two.

I still want to make a battery out of an orange

Offline Arkcon

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Yeah, it can be a little hard for a layman to get a hold of, but do you really need them?  Pyrex canning jars are as good as Pyrex beakers.  Maybe a few graduated cylinders are a good idea, if you think you experiments call for accurate volume measurements.  Have you heard of Edmund Scientific -- http://scientificsonline.com/ , they are a little over priced, but they have a nice selection of small laboratory pieces.
Hey, I'm not judging.  I just like to shoot straight.  I'm a man of science.

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