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Topic: a question about covalent bond  (Read 6314 times)

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kayvanfar67

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a question about covalent bond
« on: March 09, 2005, 10:13:49 AM »
here is my question:

we know that (s) and (o2) can make a covalent bond.
now please tell me why (s) and (o) can not do this?

 ???

Offline movies

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Re:a question about covalent bond
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2005, 03:48:56 PM »
What do you mean?  There are examples of S-O bonds which are covalent.  S can't bond to O2 though because O2 already has a full octet.

kayvanfar67

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Re:a question about covalent bond
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2005, 09:32:47 AM »
i mean that S and O2 can make a molecules with covalent bond. but S and O cannot make a molecules with covalent bond. so why?   ???
you are right my question was not right. i'm sorry for this.  :-[

Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:a question about covalent bond
« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2005, 10:38:59 AM »
Are you asking why sulphur reacts with the diatomic oxygen molecule to form covalent product, but not react with oxygen radical? If this is what you are asking, I can tell you is that forming the O=O bond is more thermodynamically favoured than S-O or S=O bonds because being small and the same size, the degree of overlap of the O valence orbitals would be greater, and thus stronger bond, and hence more exothermic than forming the sulphur-oxygen bonds. Hence, the oxygen radicals are more likely to react with each other before reacting with sulphur.
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