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Topic: Isolation of Calcium from CaCO3  (Read 8282 times)

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Nihilist

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Isolation of Calcium from CaCO3
« on: April 20, 2004, 09:25:26 PM »
My plan is

Add marble chips to some HCl until they stop reacting and there is some left at the bottom of the beaker.

Filter and throw away the excess CaCO3. The solution should be neutral by now

CaCO3 + 2HCl --> CaCl2 + CO2 + H2O

Boil the solution down until there is little enough to put into a flat dish and to dry it off in an oven.

----

For my electrolysis setup I'm gonna use a 12v adjustable DC adaptor and carbon graphite rods from inside the big square batteries that are used in torches for the electrodes.

There will be about 4/5 cathodes depending on how many I can get and only 1 or 2 anodes. Im using more cathodes so I'm able to pick up more Ca at once.

----

Melt the CaCO3 CaCl2 (takes near 800ºC) and place the electrodes into it then turn it on.

Do this outside or in a fume cupboard!! Cl2 gas will be released, this is poisonous and if inhaled. As Cl2 is heavier than air it will fall towards the ground.

Cathode equation:
Ca2+ + 2e -> Ca

Anode equation:
2Cl- -> Cl2 + 2e

Questions:

What would the erosion on the electrodes be like? Would there be a better choice for this experiment? (I wonder how much some platinum rods would cost...)

Are my equations right?

Suggestions and comments welcome :)


EDIT: Just fixing those sub things
« Last Edit: April 22, 2004, 08:32:46 PM by Nihilist »

Offline AWK

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Re:Isolation of Calcium from CaCO3
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2004, 06:07:48 AM »
1. To obtain anhydrous CaCl2 you need at least 260 C.

2. Industrial electrolysis is conducted at 780-800 C in iron vessels with graphite electrodes.
At this temperature calcium chloride is molted (mp 772 C).Mixture with CaF2 (mp=816 C) is used instead of pure calcium chloride.

3. CaCO3 start decomposing at this temperature (not melting). Electrochemistry is OK. Process should be done in stream of inert gas (eg argon). Chlorine is extremely toxic. You forgot about diffusion of gases.

My comment to questions. Platinum react with chlorine over 500 C and cannot be used as material for electrodes. Iron reacts with chlorine at 350 C giving FeCl3 which easily sublimes but at 800 C thermodynamically stable is FeCl2 which does not sublime and corrosion is not too dangerous for vessel.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2004, 10:01:36 AM by AWK »
AWK

Nihilist

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Re:Isolation of Calcium from CaCO3
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2004, 08:24:22 PM »
Oops. I didnt mean to say melt the CaCO3  :-[ I meant the CaCl2.

Why is CaF2 added to the CaCl2?

What would happen if I used Iron nails for the cathodes? Would this affect the amount of Cl2 gas produced?

Offline AWK

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Re:Isolation of Calcium from CaCO3
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2004, 05:40:32 AM »
CaF2 is added as fluxing agent. It can also undergo electrolysis if to high oltage will be used.

Yes, iron electrodes after reaction with chlorine will greatly decrease current strenght.
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Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:Isolation of Calcium from CaCO3
« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2004, 09:31:49 AM »
What's a fluxing agent? Something that lower the melting point of the molten electrolyte?

Isolation of Ca? They would form near the cathode? I think Ca would have a lower density than molten CaCl2. If so, u can just tap it off
"Say you're in a [chemical] plant and there's a snake on the floor. What are you going to do? Call a consultant? Get a meeting together to talk about which color is the snake? Employees should do one thing: walk over there and you step on the friggin� snake." - Jean-Pierre Garnier, CEO of Glaxosmithkline, June 2006

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