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Topic: Dissociation?  (Read 4503 times)

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Offline Zeta.Bit

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Dissociation?
« on: March 02, 2008, 05:23:15 PM »
Hi everyone. I was just wondering what it means when a species is dissociated in something. How does dissociation affect chemical equilibrium?


Hope my post doesn't mess up anything, I'm new to the forums :-[

Offline Arkcon

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Re: Dissociation?
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2008, 05:40:07 PM »
I was just wondering what it means when a species is dissociated in something.

Generally, dissociation means an ionic solid has separated into it's ions in solution.

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How does dissociation affect chemical equilibrium?

That's too general a question.  Maybe you should read your textbook's definitions of these words so you can ask something more specific.

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Hope my post doesn't mess up anything, I'm new to the forums :-[
Nothing seems broken, so far.
Hey, I'm not judging.  I just like to shoot straight.  I'm a man of science.

Offline Zeta.Bit

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Re: Dissociation?
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2008, 05:53:57 PM »

Generally, dissociation means an ionic solid has separated into it's ions in solution.


I see. I remember something about water being able to dissociate ionic compounds. That's the same thing right? But I'm wondering, is it possible for things like gases to dissociate? And if they can, does it mean that the gas has split up like ionic compounds become seperate ions in solution or that the gas has been spread around equally?  ???

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Nothing seems broken, so far.

Great! :)

Offline ARGOS++

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Re: Dissociation?
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2008, 06:30:22 PM »
Dear Zeta.Bit;

Precisely!, ─     
But Water is not the only medium/solvent where Dissociation can be observed or measured, but one of the most important!

There are quite a lot, and there are even “Non-Solutions” where Ions from Dissociation exist as in “Fused Salts”.
And even in the “Gas-Phase” you can produce Ions and define it also as Dissociation; for an Example you may think of the Vacuum of a “Mass-Spectrometer” (maybe a little exotic of this kind). Also in the “Galactic Space” a numerous Ions of different kind exist.

Beside your textbook you may also visit:    "Dissociation


Good Luck!
                    ARGOS++


Offline Arkcon

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Re: Dissociation?
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2008, 06:46:10 PM »
And if they can, does it mean that the gas has split up like ionic compounds become seperate ions in solution or that the gas has been spread around equally?

Look at this question by someone else, about colligative properties, to see ionization applications.  There is a gas, mentioned, in that question, see what you think.

http://www.chemicalforums.com/index.php?topic=23534.msg89323#msg89323

It's fair when you're just starting out to concentrate on ionic salts dissociating in water.  But other polar solvents, like liquid ammonia, can also dissociate ionic compounds.  Also, if a substance can take or donate electrons from the solvent, we say it dissociates as well, look at the NH3 gas in the link above, can you see how this applies?
Hey, I'm not judging.  I just like to shoot straight.  I'm a man of science.

Offline Zeta.Bit

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Re: Dissociation?
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2008, 10:09:36 PM »
Thanks guys. Made it clearer. :)

Offline ARGOS++

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Re: Dissociation?
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2008, 10:08:05 AM »

Dear Zeta.Bit;

You’re welcome!   ─   Soon again.


Good Luck!
                    ARGOS++


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