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Topic: O2 - Is this what a fire needs to burn?  (Read 19425 times)

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Offline constant thinker

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Re:O2 - Is this what a fire needs to burn?
« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2005, 09:04:01 PM »
Wow. Corroding ceramics and glass. THAT"S NUTS.

How are you suppose to store the stuff?
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Offline Alberto_Kravina

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Re:O2 - Is this what a fire needs to burn?
« Reply #16 on: December 09, 2005, 08:21:03 AM »
I think that fluorine reacts with glass forming silicon tetrafluoride (Glass is a silicate). No idea how fluorine is stored, though.

Offline Borek

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Re:O2 - Is this what a fire needs to burn?
« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2005, 10:12:13 AM »
It is enough to cover inside of the bottle with paraffin.
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Offline limpet chicken

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Re:O2 - Is this what a fire needs to burn?
« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2005, 09:32:11 PM »
Borek, are you suicidal? the F2 would definately first fluorinate the hydrocarbons, then would gradually exchange fluorine bonded to the hydrocarbons with free F2, and slowly begin to attack a non-resistant container.

That is, if the fluorine didn't just burn the grease on contact, although I don't think it would, I do know a film of hydrocarbon grease is only a temporary stopgap though to increase the life of glass ampoules.
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Offline Borek

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Re:O2 - Is this what a fire needs to burn?
« Reply #19 on: December 10, 2005, 04:32:49 AM »
Borek, are you suicidal?

My mistake - parafin works not for F2 but for HF. For F2 nickel or Monel alloy should be used, as they get passivated.
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Re:O2 - Is this what a fire needs to burn?
« Reply #20 on: December 20, 2005, 10:51:04 PM »
Crackerjack--

"If you introduce a small to fair amount of CO2 to a fire, mixed with O2, how much will it prevent the fire from burning?"

Since the equilibrium of most combustion reactions lies incredibly far towards the formation of products, the accumulation of products (CO2 + H2O will not drive the reaction backwards or even approach equilibrium. Therefore, you can be sure that as long as the atmosphere contains a decent percentage of O2 like say 21% it doesn't matter whether the other gas is N2, Argon, or CO2

Offline dfx-

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Re:O2 - Is this what a fire needs to burn?
« Reply #21 on: December 25, 2005, 03:48:06 PM »
agreed. I've never read anything to the contrary.  combustion is not combustion without O2


I can second that..
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