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Topic: Making a ferrous compound  (Read 8019 times)

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Corvettaholic

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Making a ferrous compound
« on: April 22, 2004, 06:58:07 PM »
So its pretty common knowledge that iron is ferrous, and great for magnets. Plain 'ol iron, just chilling there all by itself. So if you have a compound, such as iron oxide, does the ferrous properties follow the iron? I don't remember if rust is as magnetic as regular iron or not. What else besides iron is ferrous anyways? Dunno if I asked the last question on another thread or not, real short term memory  ;D

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Re:Making a ferrous compound
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2004, 07:05:22 PM »
Iron oxide is magnetic I think but not as much. You can refine iron ore from plain dirt by running a rare earth magnet through it.
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Corvettaholic

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Re:Making a ferrous compound
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2004, 07:07:14 PM »
Really? I got some pretty big rare earth magnets I scavenged from a SCSI hard drive. Those things can smash your fingers if you aren't careful! The only compounds I really know that involve iron is well.. iron, and iron oxide. Steel has iron and a bunch of other goodies in it, and thats kinda magnetic too. So maybe ferrous properties DO follow the iron around, but are mitigated by other stuff thats stuck to it. I imagine the oxide portion of iron oxide doesn't want its electron spin messed with unlike iron.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2004, 07:07:35 PM by Corvettaholic »

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Re:Making a ferrous compound
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2004, 07:11:22 PM »
I think that’s generally true but there are other magnetic substances.
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Corvettaholic

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Re:Making a ferrous compound
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2004, 07:12:46 PM »
When I find out what they are, I want to play with them. Any of them liquid? I think it'd be really neat to mess with liquid magnetics. Some company used to sell some stuff they called ferrofluid that was magnetic, but I don't remember what was in it.

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Re:Making a ferrous compound
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2004, 07:19:48 PM »
I think it was nanoparticles of iron.
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Corvettaholic

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Re:Making a ferrous compound
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2004, 07:30:43 PM »
How do you make nanoparticles of anything? Gotta be expensive!

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Re:Making a ferrous compound
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2004, 08:13:34 PM »
I don't know, but you can buy atomized metals.
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